About briansolomon1

Author of more than 50 books on railways, photography, and Ireland. Brian divides his time between the United States and Ireland, and frequently travels across Europe and North America.

TRACKING THE LIGHT SPECIAL POST: Radio Interview with KSEN AM

The Jerry Puffer Show Interviews Brian Solomon.

Radio host, Jerry Puffer at KSEN 1150 AM (Shelby, Montana) will broadcast the interview on Wednesday June 18, 2014 in the 4:30 pm slot (4:30 pm Mountain Time/6:30pm standard time/11:30pm in Dublin and London). You can tune in via the internet.

On the KSEN webpage use the ‘Listen Live’ feature. See: http://ksenam.com/jerry-puffer/

or ksenam.com.

Brian spoke with Jerry for about 25 minutes, and discussed railroads, photography and Ireland, as well as his new book The Twilight of Steam, and Tracking the Light!

For anyone who wants to tune in, Jerry said that Brian will probably come on at about 4:36 pm mountain time (after introductory commentary, and other events).

Check it out!

Don’t forget, 6:30pm Eastern Standard Time Wednesday June 18th, Brian Solomon will be speaking on the Jerry Puffer Show KSEN 1150 AM!

Brian’s book, The Twilight of Steam was published by Voyageur Press.

http://www.voyageurpress.com/

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Brian Solomon’s The Twilight of Steam on Sale Now!

A Celebration of Steam from the Steam Era.

Russel_Buck_with_Twilight_of_Steam_2_P1040624

Russell Buck, son of late photographer Robert A. Buck, holds a preview copy of Brian Solomon’s The Twilight of Steam. This book features photography and stories from some of the great steam photographers.

The book can be viewed at Palmer Hobbies on 1428 Main Street in Palmer, Massachusetts. Phone: 413-436-5318. Open Tuesday to Saturday.

The Twilight of Steam is available from Voyageur Press. Click here for details.

'Some of dad's photos'—Russell Buck.

‘Some of dad’s photos’—Russell Buck.

I’ll be revealing more about the book over the next few days! Stay tuned.

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Streetcar Photos and a Canoe on a Suburu.

Odd but True!

A couple of weeks ago I was visiting my brother in Philadelphia. He suggested that we take his canoe and explore the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge near the Philadelphia Airport. So we strapped the craft to the top of the car and drove via city streets across the city.

SEPTA's number 15 Streetcar takes the corner at 63rd Street. Vintage PCCs are a feature of this route. Canon EOS 7D photo.

SEPTA’s number 15 Streetcar takes the corner at 63rd Street. Vintage PCCs are a feature of this route. Canon EOS 7D photo.

Silhouette from the Subaru with PCC 2326 in the background.

Silhouette from the Subaru with PCC 2326 in the background.

SEPTA's Market-Frankfurt elevated at 63rd Street.

SEPTA’s Market-Frankfurt elevated at 63rd Street.

SEPTA's number 34 streetcar works west.

SEPTA’s number 34 streetcar works west.

View from the canoe at the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge.

View from the canoe at the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge.

Look an Eagle!

Look an eagle!

SEPTA's Airport Train.

SEPTA’s Airport Train.

SEPTA number 36 streetcar outbound at Eastwick.

SEPTA number 36 streetcar outbound at Eastwick.

Our route conveniently intersected many of SEPTA’s surviving streetcar lines. And while at the wildlife refuge, I was able to make views of SEPTA’s heavy rail Airport Line. I made all of these images with my Canon EOS 7D during the course of the trip.

My brother’s blog called the Sanguine Root features stories about Urban Environmental Restoration: http://www.thesanguineroot.com/

For Streamliners  photos, click here to reach Tracking the Light’s Streamliners at Spencer page.

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Brian Solomon’s The Twilight of Steam, Behind the Scenes

John E. Pickett, Steam Hunter.

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John Pickett with his Graflex in July 2013. Photo by Brian Solomon

John E. Pickett is among the great photographers I featured in my book The Twilight of Steam. A life long friend of Jim Shaughnessy (also featured), John has had the opportunity to photograph steam locomotives all across North America.

In the 1940s, he was fortunate to grow up in Canajoharie, New York, located just across the Mohawk River from New York Central’s four-track mainline at Palentine Bridge. His early experiences watching the parade of Hudsons, Mohawks, and Niagaras working the Water Level Route inspired him to make wonderful photographs of locomotives at work before diesels took over.

John's early New York Central photos were exposed with 616 Kodak Monitor but he later bought a National Graflex that had a relatively fast Bausch & Lomb f3.5 lens and 1/500th of a second top shutter speed, and then a Series B Graflex with a top shutter speed of 1/1000th.

John’s early New York Central photos were exposed with 616 Kodak Monitor but he later bought a National Graflex that had a relatively fast Bausch & Lomb f3.5 lens and 1/500th of a second top shutter speed, and then a Series B Graflex with a top shutter speed of 1/1000th.

The Twilight of Steam features dozens of John’s images and tells of his experiences and techniques.

The Twilight of Steam was published by Voyageur Press and will be available from June 15, 2014.

I’ll be revealing more about the book over the next few days! Stay tuned.

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Union Pacific Coal Train—Ten Years to the Day.

Silhouette at Sunset.

West of Rochelle, Illinois, June 15, 2004: the sky was aflame with the evening glow. As the setting sun illuminated prairie-dust and low cloud that had blown in from the west.

I was parked near the Global III intermodal yard south of Union Pacific’s former Chicago & North Western mainline. This is a busy stretch of railroad.

A Union Pacific coal train works east near Rochelle, Illinois. Exposed with a Nikon F3 on Fujichrome slide film. Notice the ditch-lights; I’ve given just enough of an angle so there’s the faint twinkle at the front of the locomotive.

A Union Pacific coal train works east near Rochelle, Illinois. Exposed with a Nikon F3 on Fujichrome slide film. Notice the ditch-lights; I’ve given just enough of an angle so there’s the faint twinkle at the front of the locomotive.

Central Illinois is flat open country which is prefect for making sunset silhouettes: using the big sky as back drop for a train.

Here I’ve taken nearly a broadside position, exposed for the sky while keeping the train in the lower quarter of the frame.

When I worked at Pacific RailNews in the mid-1990s, we favored silhouetted views with lots of sky to use for opening spreads. It was the style to lay headlines and text in the sky.

I’ve always like the simplicity of silhouettes; raw and dramatic with details largely left to the imagination.Tracking the Light posts new material every morning.

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Brian Solomon’s Latest Book: The Twilight of Steam

Iconic Railroad Photographs from Great Photographers.

 Tomorrow, June 15, 2014, my latest book titled The Twilight of Steam officially goes on sale.

This was my big book project for 2013, and I spent much of last summer researching and writing it. Yet, the real stars of the book are the contributing photographers and their outstanding work.

PRR’s four-track Middle Division (Harrisburg to Altoona, Pennsylvania) was a favorite for photographers because of its accessibility, splendid scenery and a continuous parade of freight and passenger trains. PRR’s big boiler M1 Mountains were a standard mainline freight power from the mid-1920s until the diesels took over. The M1 shared the boiler used by the I1s 2-10-0 ‘Hippo’, where the I1s was intended for slow-speed drag freight work, the M1 was designed for relatively fast mainline running. These were good looking locomotives and made for great photos. Photo by John E. Pickett

PRR’s four-track Middle Division (Harrisburg to Altoona, Pennsylvania) was a favorite for photographers because of its accessibility, splendid scenery and a continuous parade of freight and passenger trains. PRR’s big boiler M1 Mountains were a standard mainline freight power from the mid-1920s until the diesels took over. The M1 shared the boiler used by the I1s 2-10-0 ‘Hippo’, where the I1s was intended for slow-speed drag freight work, the M1 was designed for relatively fast mainline running. These were good looking locomotives and made for great photos. Photo by John E. Pickett

Over the years, I’ve been privileged to interview and work with some of the most accomplished railway photographers in North America. Significantly, TheTwilight of Steam focuses on evocative images exposed toward the era of revenue steam operations.

These were exposed when steam locomotives were still active, and not of excursion services after the end of the era. In many instances, I’ve included photos with steam and first generation diesels working together or side by side.

For this book, I’ve adapted my Tracking the Light concepts. In addition to simply writing about the locomotives, where possible I’ve included stories about the photographer’s techniques and experiences. I included details about their cameras and films.

Many of the photographers were very young when they began making dramatic railway images, and that is a great part of the story.

The Twilight of Steam was published by Voyageur Press and will be available from June 15, 2014.

I’ll be revealing more about the book over the next few days! Stay tuned.

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TRACKING THE LIGHT Looks at North Carolina Light Rail

A Brief Glimpse of Charlotte’s Lynx.

It was a bright afternoon in Charlotte. I was curious to see this city’s innovative light rail system that uses Siemens built trams. Charlotte’s public transport goes by the initial’s ‘CATS’ while the Blue Line light rail is called the ‘Lynx.’

More tracks are being built, and a heritage style trolley is in the works.

Here’s a few views made with the Lumix LX-7.

Lynx_logo_P1040032

Lynx outbound near Tremont with Charlotte skyline.

Lynx outbound near Tremont with Charlotte skyline.

Some of the light rail cars carry advertising.

Some of the light rail cars carry advertising.

Light rail along Norfolk Southern in suburban Charlotte.

Light rail along Norfolk Southern in suburban Charlotte.

Charlotte_MOD1_IMG_6589

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TRACKING THE LIGHT SPECIAL POST: Palmer Hobbies Now Open!

A view inside. 

Proprietor of Palmer Hobbies, Bill Lanza, has opened his doors!

Come in and have a look around!

Palmer Hobbies' Bill Lanza assists a customer.

Palmer Hobbies’ Bill Lanza assists a customer.

Fine Turf on sale at Palmer Hobbies.

Fine Turf on sale at Palmer Hobbies.

New products for viewing.

New products for viewing.

Bill Lanza (left) and Rich Reed (right) discuss locomotive details.

Bill Lanza (left) and Rich Reed (right) discuss locomotive details.

Palmer Hobbies is prominently located on Main Street. Come in and read their magazines!

Palmer Hobbies is prominently located on Main Street. Come in and read their magazines!

Palmer Hobbies features a variety of model railway products, magazines, and, of course, railroad books!

Patrons of the old Tucker’s Hobbies (formerly Tucker’s Hardware) in nearby Warren, Massachusetts will find familiar faces.

The new store is easy to find. It’s located at 1428 Main Street in Palmer, Massachusetts. Take the Massachusetts Turnpike to Palmer, turn right and drive toward Depot Village. The shop is located in the center at the lights near the Hess Station and across from the CVS drug store.

Palmer Hobbies is near the famous Palmer Diamond, where New England Central’s former Central Vermont crosses CSXT’s Boston & Albany route. It’s across the tracks from the popular Steaming Tender restaurant (near CP 83).

On June 11, 2014. A CSX tie gang works the old Boston & Albany route. In the distance is the popular Steaming Tender railroad themed-restuarant.

On June 11, 2014. A CSX tie gang works the old Boston & Albany route. In the distance is the popular Steaming Tender railroad themed-restuarant.

Phone: 413-436-5318. Open Tuesday to Saturday. (Closed on Sunday and Monday).

See: www.palmerhobbies.com

For  Streamliner  photos, click here for Tracking the Light’s Streamliners at Spencer page.

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Piedmont and the Pennsy.

Passenger Trains at Salisbury, North Carolina.

May 30, 2014, Salisbury’s Innes Street Overpass was a popular gathering point for photographers seeking mainline attraction during North Carolina Transportation Museum’s Streamliners at Spencer event.

At lunchtime, I was poised to photograph Amtrak number 75, one of North Carolina sponsored Piedmont services that runs with F59PHI diesels and heritage style equipment. This is one of the most distinctive long distance trains on the East Coast.

Amtrak number 75 makes its station stop at Salisbury, North Carolina. Exposed with a Canon EOS 7D with 200mm lens.

Amtrak number 75 makes its station stop at Salisbury, North Carolina. Exposed with a Canon EOS 7D with 200mm lens.

Lumix LX-7 view of Amtrak 75 Piedmont at Salisbury, North Carolina. This is one of the only F59PHI's in Amtrak service east of the Sierra.

Lumix LX-7 view of Amtrak 75 Piedmont at Salisbury, North Carolina. This is one of the only F59PHI’s in Amtrak service east of the Sierra.

I returned in the evening, to catch Juniata Terminal’s Pennsylvania E8A 5809 and three matching streamlined cars on its return run from Spencer to Charlotte. The sun made a surprise appearance just in the nick of time.

Lumix LX-7 photo at Innes Street, Salisbury, North Carolina.

Lumix LX-7 photo at Innes Street, Salisbury, North Carolina.

For more Streamliners  photos, click here to reach Tracking the Light’s Streamliners at Spencer page.

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Brooklyn, New York—TRACKING THE LIGHT DAILY POST

November 1998.

It was a dull autumn day. My father and I were in New York City to visit a friend. We spent the afternoon wandering around on the subway system.

An L train Brooklyn, New York, November 1998. Exposed with a Nikon F3T with 24mm lens. (The route is L, not to be confused with the colloquial 'El' or Chicago's 'L', just for clarification).

An L train Brooklyn, New York, November 1998. Exposed with a Nikon F3T with 24mm lens. (The route is L, not to be confused with the colloquial ‘El’ or Chicago’s ‘L’, just for clarification).

I made this photo at East New York Junction where the Canarsie Line crosses the Broadway Line.

The sky was dark and swollen and the street lights were just coming on. To make the most of the lighting, I exposed this photo on black & white film with my Nikon F3T with an AI 24mm Nikkor lens.

I’ve always felt there was an apocalyptic aesthetic to this image.

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Nickel Plate Road Alco PA.

An Impostor, but still nice to see.

Ok, so this Alco PA was delivered new to the Santa Fe, and in later years worked for Delaware & Hudson, and then for Mexican railways. But now it wears a fresh coat of Nickel Plate Road paint.

Until Streamliners at Spencer, I’d never had the opportunity to photograph an Alco PA, a locomotive often cited as one of the most loved and most attractive (if not the most reliable) of the steam to diesel transition era.

PA_and_RDG_FP7_P1030243

The Nickel Plate Road merged into Norfolk & Western two years before I was born, so while I’ve photographed trains on the old Nickel Plate route, I never knew the railway either.

PA_nose_detail_IMG_6133

So there you go. It’s like meeting a ghost. Or, perhaps, seeing a James Joyce impersonator. Or, going to listen to a Led Zeppelin tribute-band.

When it comes to a Nickel Plate Road PA, I never experienced the real thing, and I never will. I never saw an Erie Triplex either.

PA_builders_plate_IMG_6104

For more Streamliners  photos, click here to reach Tracking the Light’s Streamliners at Spencer page.

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DAILY POST: Wisconsin & Southern at Avalon.

August 20, 2011.

 Avalon is at the heart of Arthurian myth. And, as it happens, it’s also on Wisconsin & Southern’s former Milwaukee Road Line between Janesville and Chicago!

No knights in armor here, nor Merlin, nor Lady of the Lake; just a matched set of SD40-2s in clean paint leading a long freight and tall late season grasses blowing gently in the wind.

A few hours earlier I’d met up John Gruber at the Janesville Roundhouse and we spent a pleasant afternoon photographing this freight. We had a fair wait at Avalon before the train came into view.

Exposed with a Canon EOS 7D with 200mm lens. ISO 200.

Exposed with a Canon EOS 7D with 200mm lens. ISO 200.

This photo is among my favorite from the day. I used a long lens to compress the locomotives while setting the grass in the foreground out of focus. I also made a closer view on Fujichrome film.

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Freight Trains of the Past

Remembering Irish Rail’s Athy Cement.

A few weeks ago, Ciarán Cooney asked me about photos I’d made of Irish Rail’s Athy Cement. This used to run weekdays from the cement factory near Limerick to a cement silo off a short branch that crossed the River Barrow in Athy, County Kildare. It was the only train to use this branch.

On several occasions, I’d made the effort to photograph this train, which tended to arrive laden in the very early morning, then depart empty after it had discharged. Most of the times I saw it, it ran with a single Bo-Bo General Motors diesel (class 141 or 181).

I caught it crossing the Barrow at Athy on a fine spring morning, May 3, 2002.

 Exposed with a Nikon F3 with 85mm lens on Fujichrome Sensia 100 slide film.


Exposed with a Nikon F3 with 85mm lens on Fujichrome Sensia 100 slide film.

That was more than 11 years ago, but it doesn’t seem so long.I think I last photographed this train about 2005, shortly before it was discontinued. While cement trains worked Irish Rail for a few more years, they are now extinct.

Exposed with a Nikon F3 with 85mm lens on Fujichrome Sensia 100 slide film.

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Tracking the Light Corners Pan Am Railways Number 1

No Escape this Time!

To compensate for bad luck, and a series of bad timings, I made it a point to photograph Pan Am Railways executive F-unit at Spencer.

What?

Just about every time Pan Am Railway’s has run their glossy metallic blue F-units, I’ve either been in the air, out of the country, and/or at least a thousand miles away and traveling in the wrong direction.

Not this time. Not at Spencer. No, I knew I’d get a photo! Two or three, maybe, and in color!

I realize that PAR-1 may not have been the chief attraction of the Streamliners at Spencer event, but I  was very happy to finally see this New England resident up close and in person!

PAR 1 and Southern Railway 6133 bask in the morning light at Spencer, North Carolina. Lumix LX-7 photo.

PAR 1 and Southern Railway 6133 bask in the morning light at Spencer, North Carolina. Lumix LX-7 photo.

Cab detail of F9A PAR-1 exposed with my Canon EOS 7D with 100mm lens.

Cab detail of F9A PAR-1 exposed with my Canon EOS 7D with 100mm lens.

The logo that once graced globe-encircling Boeing 747s decorates PAR 1.

The logo that once graced globe-encircling Boeing 747s decorates PAR 1.

For more Streamliners  photos, click here to reach Tracking the Light’s Streamliners at Spencer page.

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Streamliners at Spencer: Looking Beyond the Main Event—Part2

 Exhibits and Antiques in Addition to the Streamliners.

Ladies and Gentlemen! Step right up! Lots to see! Something for everyone!

Psst, hey buddy, wanna see an Edsel? 

Edsel_P1030164

Edsel_P1030166

Hey! If Amtrak number 42 was working train 448, I’d be all over that! And yet, here’s 42 basking in bright sun for all to see.

Amtrak_42_low_P1030102

Amtrak_42_rear_view_P1030098

N&W_620_frontal_P1020973

N&W_620_P1020995

And more!

Click here to see my Streamliners at Spencer page.

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N&W_square_P1030142

 

 

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Streamliners at Spencer: Looking Beyond the Main Event—Part1

Great Railway Exhibits and Antiques in Addition to the Streamlined Superstars.

In an environment characterized by streamlined sensory overload, it takes a trained eye (pardon pun) to see past Norfolk & Western’s 611, Burlington’s stainless steel E5A, Union Pacific’s radiant executive E-unit and the rest of the colorful Es and Fs paraded on display around the Spencer roundhouse.

Yet, in addition to the vintage streamliners, there were other noteworthy exhibits and interesting equipment. Amtrak’s 40th Anniversary Display Train with locomotive 42 (painted to commemorate America’s Veterans) was featured prominently, as was one of North Carolina’s train sets used for Piedmont services.

Pacific_Bend_P1030130

Amtrak_42_detail_P1030101

Various heritage locomotives attached to the Spencer shops added period interest. Back in the day (1980s), I was quite pleased to find a Southern high-hood GP30 working at Alexandria, Virginia. And lo and behold, here at Spencer was preserved locomotive just like the one I saw those many years ago!

Southern_2601_nose_profile_detail_head_on_IMG_6361

Southern_2601_detail_IMG_6349

Southern_2601_roster_IMG_6352

NC_1755_cab_detail_IMG_6119

NC_1755_w_Wigwag_P1030134

Glint_NC_1755_IMG_6575

Plymouth_P1030168

For those interested in automobiles, Spencer has quite a collection of vintage cars on display. Lots to see and do! I’m glad I invested almost four days in the event.

Texico_P1030170

 

Stay tuned for more photos soon!

Also: click here to see my Streamliners at Spencer page.

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Photograph Featured in Today’s Palmer Journal Register

June 5, 2014, Page 2.

One of my photographs is featured today in the Palmer, Massachusetts Journal Register.

Page 2, Palmer Journal Register, June 5, 2014. Photo exposed with a Lumix LX-7.

Page 2, Palmer Journal Register, June 5, 2014. Photo exposed with a Lumix LX-7.

For Streamliners  photos, click on Tracking the Light’s Streamliners at Spencer page.

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Tracking the Light Looks at the N&W J

611 at Spencer, May 2014.

Exposed with a Lumix LX-7. The diffused light made for wonderful reflections.

Exposed with a Lumix LX-7. The diffused light made for wonderful reflections.

Among the stars of the Streamliner’s at Spencer event was Norfolk & Western 611, one of only a handful of preserved American streamlined steam locomotives. Here’s a sampling of the many images I made, and an excerpt of the text from my book Super Steam published by MBI (out of print), where I detailed the J class. Today the locomotive catches attention for its streamlined shrouds, but there’s a lot more to the N&W J than just good looks:

“Among the most impressive products of N&W’s Roanoke Shops were its 14 Class J 4-8-4s. These spectacular machines defied convention while settting record for performance and reliability. The first five J’s were built during 1941 and 1942, with N&W’s distinctive streamlined shrouds, and featured 27×32 inch cylinders, 70-inch drivers, 107.7 square foot firebox grate, and a huge boiler set for 275 lb. psi operation. As built these locomotives delivered 73,300 lbs. tractive effort. (N&W later increased the boiler pressure to 300 psi, and as result tractive effort was increased to 80,000 lbs.) The J class exhibited all of the trappings of modern locomotive, featuring roller bearings on all axles and reciprocating parts, one-piece cast steel frame, mechanical lubrication and light weight alloy-steel rods . . .”

611 Noir. Exposed with a Canon EOS 7D.

611 Noir. Exposed with a Canon EOS 7D.

N&W 611 surrounded by the enemy.

N&W 611 surrounded by the enemy.

611 in stereo. Lumix LX-7 photo. There's nothing like a good puddle to make a great photo!

611 in stereo. Lumix LX-7 photo. There’s nothing like a good puddle to make a great photo!

Nose view of one of America's most famous locomotives. Exposed with a Lumix LX-7.

Nose view of one of America’s most famous locomotives. Exposed with a Lumix LX-7.

For more Streamliners  photos, click on Tracking the Light’s Streamliners at Spencer page.

 

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Tracking the Light update: Six new photos added to the Streamliners at Spencer page.

TRACKING the LIGHT posts new material every day.

I’ve been reviewing the hundreds of digital color photos I exposed at Spencer and I’ve added six of my favorites  to my special page dedicated to the event.

See my: Streamliners at Spencer photos to view the latest!

To view more please Click on the link: http://wp.me/P2BVuC-1O8

To view more please Click on the link: http://wp.me/P2BVuC-1O8

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Streamliner Noir

On the Darker Side of Spencer!

Part of the attraction of North Carolina Transportation Museum’s Streamliners at Spencer event was the pre-arranged night photograph sessions. Large industrial scale flood lamps were arranged to provide roughly even lighting on locomotives that had been arranged and spotted specifically for photography.

A look at the darker side of night photography! A view of Spencer shops exposed with a Lumix LX-7.

A look at the darker side of night photography! A view of Spencer shops exposed with a Lumix LX-7.

I’ve often worked on the darker side of photography, and this was no exception. While I took advantage of the ‘arranged’ lighting to make standard views of the equipment. I made a special effort to go beyond the obvious.

Here I worked in the shadows, using the lights in a more interpretive way. I sought out scenes of the shops and facilities that were part of the background.

Crime scene or photoline?  The local constabulary provided security at the event. Exposed with a Canon EOS 7D.

Crime scene or photoline? The local constabulary provided security at the event. Exposed with a Canon EOS 7D.

This view of Norfolk & Western 611 caught my eye. At the time there must have been 75 people with tripods set up for the 3/4 angle. Exposed with a Lumix LX-7.

This view of Norfolk & Western 611 caught my eye. At the time there must have been 75 people with tripods set up for the 3/4 angle. Exposed with a Lumix LX-7.

Rain made for a nice shiny gloss but made the difficult process of making photos in the dark even more complicated. Keeping water off lenses in the dark isn't easy. At least with digital photography, instantaneous feed back allowed me to know when droplets had spoiled a clean view (or added an extra effect). Exposed with a Canon EOS 7D.

Rain made for a nice shiny gloss but made the difficult process of making photos in the dark even more complicated. Keeping water off lenses in the dark isn’t easy. At least with digital photography, instantaneous feed back allowed me to know when droplets had spoiled a clean view (or added an extra effect). Exposed with a Canon EOS 7D.

Silhouettes with Lackawanna painted F3s. Lumix LX-7 photo.

Silhouettes with Lackawanna painted F3s. Lumix LX-7 photo.

The challenge was trying to stay out of the way of the photo lines to avoid the ire of those with a front-lit view.

On one of the evenings there was a thunderstorm, which made matters extra challenging!

After I made this image, I relaxed on the bench. Fortunately there weren't many people set up on my side of the light. Lumix LX-7 photo.

After I made this image, I relaxed on the bench. Fortunately there weren’t many people set up on my side of the light. Lumix LX-7 photo.

This angle reminded me of a Jim Shaughnessy photo exposed in the 1950s. Lumix LX-7 photo.

This angle reminded me of a Jim Shaughnessy photo exposed in the 1950s. Lumix LX-7 photo.

Here I was mostly working with the ordinary sodium vapor lights, with the lights for the night photo event only providing secondary illumination by coloring the sky. Lumix LX-7 photo.

Here I was mostly working with the ordinary sodium vapor lights, with the lights for the night photo event only providing secondary illumination by coloring the sky. Lumix LX-7 photo.

Hard glint on the Norfolk Southern business train. Keeping the lights out of the frame is part of my technique. Lumix LX-7 photo.

Hard glint on the Norfolk Southern business train. Keeping the lights out of the frame is part of my technique. Lumix LX-7 photo.

Spencer round house.

Spencer round house.

Ghostly view of the old shops.

Ghostly view of the old shops.

Spencer, North Carolina—the village across the street from the old Southern Railway shops.

Spencer, North Carolina—the village across the street from the old Southern Railway shops.

See my Streamliners at Spencer page for more photos of the event.

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Streamliners at Spencer; Fans, Photographers and the People Behind the Scenes—TRACKING THE LIGHT Special Post.

It’s not just about the equipment.

The locomotives were largely static and thus relatively easy to photograph. However, people move about constantly, and getting your friends to hold still long enough for a portrait in an environment characterized by sensory-overload, can be tough.

On the plus side, most everyone was smiling.

I used both a Canon EOS 7D and Lumix LX-7 to make digital portraits, while a few photos were captured on slide film using my EOS 3.

Below is a selection of my results.

For more Streamliners  photos, click on Tracking the Light’s Streamliners at Spencer page.

Photographers_P1020858

Paul_w_949_P1030326

Steve_P1030291

PA_shirt_P1030128

Scott_P1030071

Toward the end of long hot day.

Toward the end of long hot day.

Dan_P1030185

Salisbury.

Salisbury.

Pat_and-Joe_P1030587

Howie_IMG_6194

Bernie_P1030650

Mike_P1030341

Bill_IMG_6371

Railfan_P1030212

Railway_plate_P1020928

Photographers_at_night_PRR_and_C&O_at_night_sideview_P1030770

Crossing Innes Street in Salisbury.

Crossing Innes Street in Salisbury.

Pat_949_3_IMG_6556

Color coordination.

Color coordination.

For more Streamliners  photos, click on Tracking the Light’s Streamliners at Spencer page.

Streamliners at Spencer; Friends and Faces—TRACKING THE LIGHT Special Post.

Finding Familiar Faces Among the Masses.

Chicago & North Western 411 and friends. Canon EOS 7D photo.

Chicago & North Western 411 and friends. Canon EOS 7D photo.

For me, the Streamliners at Spencer event was a great opportunity to meet friends, old and new. In addition photographing the equipment, I photographed the photographers.

Below is a small selection. I’ll post more tomorrow!

For more Streamliners  photos, click on Tracking the Light’s Streamliners at Spencer page.

Photographers at night. Lumix LX-7 photo.

Photographers at night. Lumix LX-7 photo.

LX-7 photo at Salisbury station.

LX-7 photo at Salisbury station.

In glow of Saturday evening. Lumix LX-7 photo (before my second battery went flat).

In glow of Saturday evening. Lumix LX-7 photo (before my second battery went flat).

Media man in Salisbury. Lumix LX-7 photo.

Media man in Salisbury. Lumix LX-7 photo.

Norfolk Southern's Wick Moorman addresses Spencer. Canon EOS 7D with 200mm lens.

Norfolk Southern’s Wick Moorman addresses Spencer. Canon EOS 7D with 200mm lens.

LX-7 photo.

LX-7 photo.

Master of three-D photography. Lumix LX-7 photo.

Master of three-D photography. Lumix LX-7 photo.

Norfolk Southern Museum. LX-7 photo.

Norfolk Southern Museum. LX-7 photo.

Waiting on the Piedmont at Salisbury. Lumix LX-7 photo.

Waiting on the Piedmont at Salisbury. Lumix LX-7 photo.

LX-7 photo.

LX-7 photo.

Waiting for the turntable to spin. Lumix LX-7 photo.

Waiting for the turntable to spin. Lumix LX-7 photo.

Check out more of my Streamliners  photos, click on my Streamliners at Spencer page.

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Boston Green Line Subway—Tracking the Light Daily Post.

Two Years ago Today—June 2, 2012.

I’d been making photos on Boston’s Green Line for 40 years. Albeit I was a bit shorter for my first efforts using my Dad’s M3 in the early 1970s.

Subway photos on Kodachrome were a real challenge. I never knew if I’d gotten anything at all until the film came back weeks later. But that didn’t stop me from trying.

Boston's Green Line Subway at North Station on June 2, 2012. Exposed with a Canon 7D with 28-135mm lens.

Boston’s Green Line Subway at North Station on June 2, 2012. Exposed with a Canon 7D with 28-135mm lens.

Digital photography technique is a real boon for subway images. For these photos I’d racked up the ISO setting to 2000 and worked with a telelphoto zoom. That was inconceivable in my film days.

Boston's Green Line Subway at North Station on June 2, 2012. Exposed with a Canon 7D with 28-135mm image stabilization zoom lens.

Boston’s Green Line Subway at North Station on June 2, 2012. Exposed with a Canon 7D with 28-135mm image stabilization zoom lens.

Boston’s subways have changed quite a bit since my early photos; modern cameras for modern images.

Happy 2nd Anniversary Tim & Leslie!

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Station Stop Raleigh—TRACKING THE LIGHT SPECIAL POST.

10:20 am June 1, 2014.

At crew changes and other convenient points, Amtrak schedule’s ‘smoke breaks’ where passengers can get off the train, stretch their legs, enjoy the fresh air, and, in my case, make photos of the train.

I had about ten minutes at Raleigh, North Carolina this morning to make photos train 80, Carolinian during this momentary pause. By that time, I’d been on the train for more than 3 hours, with nearly another nine hours to go.

Rather than tow the whole camera kit, I just carried the Panasonic Lumix LX 7, which is light, easy to use, and is capable of making extremely sharp images.

Playing with the external Lumix Live View Finder, I adjusted this vertically, which allowed me to place the camera very close to the ground without the need for lying belly first on platform.

Exposed with a Lumix LX-7 using the Live View external finder. Camera set in 'A' (Aperture Priority) mode with a minus 1/3 exposure over ridge to compensate for the bright platform, bleached station sign and bright sky. This forces the camera to make a slight darker  image.

Exposed with a Lumix LX-7 using the Live View external finder. Camera set in ‘A’ (Aperture Priority) mode with a minus 1/3 exposure over ride to compensate for the bright platform, bleached station sign and bright sky. This forces the camera to make a slight darker image

The low angle with a slightly telephoto view provides a clean dramatic perspective that minimizes unnecessary and visually distracting foreground.

Number 80's conductor. Amtrak's crew was very friendly.

Number 80′s conductor. Amtrak’s crew was very friendly.

Check my Streamliners at Spencer page for photos of North Carolina Transportation Museum’s special event.

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Carolinian Morning Glint—TRACKING THE LIGHT SPECIAL POST

Transmitted from the Train June 1, 2014.

Following three and half successful days of photography at Spencer, North Carolina, Pat Yough and I boarded Amtrak 80, Carolinian at Charlotte this morning before 7am.

Charlotte, North Carolina at 6:35am June 1, 2014. Lumix LX-7 photo.

Charlotte, North Carolina at 6:35am June 1, 2014. Lumix LX-7 photo.

Charlotte, North Carolina at 6:35am June 1, 2014. Lumix LX-7 photo.

Charlotte, North Carolina at 6:35am June 1, 2014. Lumix LX-7 photo.

We departed on time at 7am. In the lead is Amtrak P42 number 168. It was a strange sensation pausing a Salisbury and passing the Spencer Shops having just spent so much time there. The view from the train always offers a different perspective than being on the ground, or seeing a place from the road.

Salisbury Station, North Carolina.  June 1, 2014. Lumix LX-7 photo.

Salisbury Station, North Carolina. June 1, 2014. Lumix LX-7 photo.

Salisbury, North Carolina.  June 1, 2014. Lumix LX-7 photo.

Salisbury, North Carolina. June 1, 2014. Lumix LX-7 photo.

As I write this we are heading toward Raleigh. I’m destined for Philadelphia. Presently, I’m reviewing, analyzing, and scaling hundreds of images I made at the event, plus side trips. I’ll be posting more images and commentary over the next few days.

Amtrak train number 80. June 1, 2014.

Amtrak train number 80. June 1, 2014.

Check my Streamliners at Spencer page for photos of the event.

 

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Irish Rail at Killiney—Tracking the Light Daily Post

Ammonia Train in May 2001.

Back then, Irish Rail operated three daily ammonia trains between Marino Point, County Cork and Shelton Abbey near Arklow, County Wicklow. These were tightly scheduled and normally operated with the common 201-class General Motors diesels.

I was tuned into these trains, and made an effort to catch them in interesting locations. The traffic ended with little warning in 2002, so the photos I made are now prized images!

Irish Rail class 201 number 204 leads a laden Ammonia train above the Irish Sea at Killiney. Is that U2's Bono waving off in the distance? Exposed on Kodak Tri-X with a Rolleiflex Model T f3.5 Tessar lens, processed in Ilford ID11 (special mix and time,  1:1 with water.)

Irish Rail class 201 number 204 leads a laden Ammonia train above the Irish Sea at Killiney. Is that U2′s Bono waving off in the distance? Exposed on Kodak Tri-X with a Rolleiflex Model T f3.5 Tessar lens, processed in Ilford ID11 (special mix and time, 1:1 with water.)

In addition to color slides, I exposed thousands of black & white images of Irish railways on 120 size film between 1999 and 2005 (and a few here and there since).

Most of these photos have never seen the light of day. This rare photo of the Ammonia train was just one of several exposures I made on that bright May afternoon in 2001.

Why didn’t I make a color photo? And who said I didn’t? Must color and black & white be mutual exclusive? Why not make a color photo and convert it later? Why color anyway?

I’ve often worked with multiple formats at the same time. Black & white has a number of advantages and I’ve long prided myself on mastering this archaic image-making process.

For more on the Ammonia Train see my earlier Tracking the Light post: http://briansolomon.com/trackingthelight/tag/ammonia-train/

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General Motors FT 103, The Diesel that Changed Railroading—Tracking the Light Special Post

Streamliners at Spencer: The Real Star of the Show?

Although streamlined steam locomotive 611 was getting most of the attention, historically the most important exhibit was General Motors FT demonstrator 103.

Last night FT 103 was lit up for all to see.

General Motors model FT lit up at Spencer Shops on May 30, 2014. Exposed with a Canon EOS 7D with 100mm lens on a Gitzo carbon-fiber tripod.

General Motors model FT lit up at Spencer Shops on May 30, 2014. Exposed with a Canon EOS 7D with 100mm lens on a Gitzo carbon-fiber tripod.

I’ve written about this locomotive in many of my books. It is the most influential American locomotive of the twentieth century because it demonstrated to the railroad industry that diesels offered a cost effective replacement for steam.

In my book Electro-Motive E and F Units (published by Voyageur Press) I offered this context for the FT:

Revolutionary FT

Electro-Motive’s most significant innovation was its development of the first commercially viable road freight diesel. From a technical perspective this was an advancement of the E-unit — the application of this long anticipated new road diesel proved revolutionary for American railroads. Once on a roll, it not only turned locomotive building on its ear, but forever changed the way railroads bought locomotives and operated trains EMD’s F-unit was the most important player in the rapid dieselization American lines.

NS CEO, Wick Moorman pointed out in yesterday’s address at Spencer, that FT 103 was ‘even older than 611,’ while sincerely thanking the St. Louis Museum of Transportation for sending the locomotive for display.

Read more about General Motors streamlined diesels, check out my book Electro-Motive E and F Unit.

Click here for more photos of the Steamliners at Spencer event.

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North Bennington on a Summer Afternoon

July 27, 2010.

Pan Am at North Bennington? Who could have imagined this 20 years ago?

Pan Am Railways RJ1 at at North Bennington; Victorian-era railway station with a sky blue 1970s-era diesel-electric. Exposed with a Canon EOS 7D.

Pan Am Railways RJ1 at at North Bennington; Victorian-era railway station with a sky blue 1970s-era diesel-electric. Exposed with a Canon EOS 7D.

I spent that morning following Vermont Rail System’s ‘B&R Job’ south from Rutland. Yet the photographic highlight was catching its connection, Pan Am’s RJ-1 local, at North Bennington.

Back in the day, Pan Am was an airline with round the world schedules. The name conjures up images of handsome blue Boeing 747s, or pre-World War II ‘Clippers’ (see planes).

Pan Am Railways is a re-branding of the Guilford system which operates former Boston & Maine and Maine Central lines. In 2007, two former Canadian National GP40-2L (sometimes identified as ‘GP40-2W’) locomotives were painted in a livery reminiscent of the old Pan Am Airlines’ scheme.

Yet, this scenario seems just a bit weird to me, like some alternate version of the future. Anyway you look at it, the combination of the restored historic station and a sky blue engine is both fascinating and strange.

North Bennington Station.

North Bennington station.

Southward Pan Am RJ-1 passes the Bennington Battlefield site. For a number of years the tracks here were largely dormant.

Southward Pan Am RJ-1 passes the Bennington Battlefield site. For a number of years the tracks here were largely dormant.

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Tomorrow: An image from the depths of the archive and never before seen!

 

 

 

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Southern 6900 at Spencer, North Carolina, May 30, 2014—Tracking the Light Special Post.

A Classic E8A at Speed.

Using the LX-7, I made a pan of Southern E8A 6900 working an excursion at North Carolina Transportation Museum’s Streamliners at Spencer event.

This beautifully restored locomotive is a vision from an earlier era. Passenger trains just don’t look like this anymore.

Exposed on May 30, 2014 using a Panasonic Lumix LX-7. Exposure f8 at 1/40th of a second. Except for scaling for internet presentation, this file is unmodified. There were no corrections to exposure, color or contrast.

Exposed on May 30, 2014 using a Panasonic Lumix LX-7. Exposure f8 at 1/40th of a second. Except for scaling for internet presentation, this file is unmodified. There were no corrections to exposure, color or contrast.

I made a spot decision to pan in order to visually separate the green on the locomotive from the densely foliated background.

Since I had only a few seconds to adjust my exposure, I left the camera in ‘A’ mode (aperture priority), added +1/3 of a stop (to lighten the scene), and turned the external aperture ring to f8, the smallest setting. This forced the camera to select a slower shutter speed, which is what I needed for a successful pan.

I moved the camera with the front of the locomotive as it passed.

One other trick: this engine was trailing, not leading.

For more Steamliners at Spencer photos click HERE.

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Conrail, Kodak and the old Hojack.

Charlotte, New York, January 1989.

When I was studying at the Rochester Institute of Technology, Kodak would annually supply photo students with a gift package of examples of their latest products.

Although I was a confirmed Kodachrome customer, as a poor student, I always make use of the other films supplied. In January 1989, I had a role of ‘Ektachrome of the year’. This was the latest 100 speed slide film.

I loaded up the Leica M2, and drove my Dodge Dart around the Rochester area looking for suitable subjects with which to sample this new emulsion.

Exposed on Kodak Ektachrome with a Leica M2. Film processed by Kodak. The image was adjusted in post-processing to compensate for exposure, contrast, and color balance.

Exposed on Kodak Ektachrome with a Leica M2. Film processed by Kodak. The image was adjusted in post-processing to compensate for exposure, contrast, and color balance.

At Charlotte, where Conrail accessed a portion of the old Hojack route, I found this local working. Was this the local freight that served Kodak’s Rochester factories on the far side of the Genesee River? I can’t say for certain, but that really would be appropriate, wouldn’t it?

January 1989; Conrail had a full ten years left. At the end of May 1999, Conrail’s independent operations ended and CSX and NS took over.

 In 2004, Tim Doherty & I authored an illustrated book on Conrail for MBI.

Learn more about the evolution of the railroad network, see my book: North American Railroad Family Trees published by Voyageur Press.

 

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Around the Table at Spencer—Diesels Dressed in Colors.

Afternoon at the North Carolina Transportation Museum, May 29, 2014.

I was keeping the Lumix busy this afternoon. The sun was elusive at times. But the selection of locomotives proved colorful.

Lumix LX-7 view of diesels at Spencer, North Carolina.

Lumix LX-7 view of diesels at Spencer, North Carolina.

Nickel Plate Road painted Alco PA at Spencer. Lumix LX-7 photo.

Nickel Plate Road painted Alco PA at Spencer. Lumix LX-7 photo.

A virtual sea of photographers at Spencer, all waiting for that perfect moment.

A virtual sea of photographers at Spencer, all waiting for that perfect moment.

A magnificent collection of fallen flags (and NS).

A magnificent collection of fallen flags (and NS).

The Burlington E5A goes for a spin. Lumix LX-7 photo.

The Burlington E5A goes for a spin. Lumix LX-7 photo.

The New Haven FL9's spin on the table went virtually undocumented, as all eyes were on Union Pacific's E9A.

The New Haven FL9′s spin on the table went virtually undocumented, as all eyes were on Union Pacific’s E9A.

Wings.

Wings.

General Motor's grand daddy of Fs with its kin.

General Motor’s grand daddy of Fs with its kin.

Tracking the Light posts new material everyday!

More on Spencer over the next few days!

Interested in learning more about American diesels? Check out my books at Voyageur Press (Click here for link).

 

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Streamliner Details, Spencer—TRACKING THE LIGHT SPECIAL POST

Morning Views, May 28, 2014—North Carolina Transportation Museum.

With more than two dozen classic locomotives to photograph, and lots of other relics of interest, I exposed more than 300 image with the Lumix LX-7 in just three hours. In addition, I was also working with my Canons, one for film, one for pixels.

Here are just some of detailed views I exposed with the Lumix. These are macro images, as opposed to wide shots that take in the whole scene. (And, yes, I made plenty of those too.)

General Motors classic FT—'the diesel that did it'.

General Motors classic FT—’the diesel that did it’.

Atlantic Coast Line E3A. Exposed with a Lumix LX-7

Atlantic Coast Line E3A. Exposed with a Lumix LX-7

Alco PA builder's plate. Is this the real thing or a replica?

Alco PA builder’s plate. Is this the real thing or a replica?

It's not all about the locomotives, this fine old passenger car caught my eye.

It’s not all about the locomotives, this fine old passenger car caught my eye.

A bit of work on a Reading FP7A. My dad caught these on the 'Crusader' back in the day.

A bit of work on a Reading FP7A. My dad caught these on the ‘Crusader’ back in the day.

Southern Railway: visions of yesterday and today. Spencer Shops was a Southern facility.

Southern Railway: visions of yesterday and today. Spencer Shops was a Southern facility.

The light was mixed. Nice soft early sun soon gave way to a hazy flat bright light. I’m glad I brought my old Minolta IV light meter, this proved very useful.

The ease of use of the Lumix LX-7 made it an especially valuable too. Today I was working with the electronic view finder, instead of the rear screen display. I wonder if this altered my compositions?

Wabash 1009. What's in a number? (When 1009 =10,000.)

Wabash 1009. What’s in a number? (When 1,009 =10,000.)

Drumhead on the Sandy Creek round-end observation car.

Drumhead on the Sandy Creek round-end observation car.

Erie Railroad E8A 833—last of its kind.

Erie Railroad E8A 833—last of its kind.

Nose view of General Motors FT 103. I'd argue that this was probably the most significant locomotive in the 20th Century. Read about it in my American Diesel Locomotive and EMD Locomotives. Books on the history of American diesels.

Nose view of General Motors FT 103. I’d argue that this was probably the most significant locomotive in the 20th Century. Read about it in my American Diesel Locomotive and EMD Locomotives. Books on the history of American diesels.

Could this be 1956?

Could this be 1956?

I was very impressed by the paint on the Lackawanna F3′s, even if they were built for the Bangor & Aroostook, What are your favorite locomotives on display at Spencer?

One of three DL&W painted F-units on display.

One of three DL&W painted F-units on display.

Washing Pennsylvania Railroad E8A 5711 at Spencer. Perhaps someone else should fling some mud and grime to make things seem more authentic?

Washing Pennsylvania Railroad E8A 5711 at Spencer. Perhaps someone else should fling some mud and grime to make things seem more authentic?

More Spencer Streamliner photos to come over the next few days!

Tracking the Light posts new material every day, with special ‘Extra’ posts on the Streamliners at Spencer event this week!

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I remember Norfolk & Western 611—TRACKING THE LIGHT SPECIAL POST

Streamlined Steam at Spencer.

It’s been almost 20 years since John Gruber and I intercepted Norfolk & Western 611 working west on the former Nickel Plate Road near Valpalraiso, Indiana. That was back in August 1994!

I also visited 611 once in Roanoke about 10 years ago.

Here she is last night at Spencer Shops, North Carolina, whereI opted for a moody backlit view.

May 28, 2014; Norfolk & Western 611. Exposed with a Lumix LX-7.

May 28, 2014; Norfolk & Western 611. Exposed with a Lumix LX-7.

More to come!

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View from the Signal Tower at Montreal Central Station—Daily Post.

Twenty Nine Years Ago Today.

I made this view on Kodachrome 64 with my Leica 3A and Summitar lens.

I made this view on Kodachrome 64 with my Leica 3A and Summitar lens.

On May 29, 1985, I was visiting Montreal, having arrived that morning on the overnight VIA Rail train from Toronto. The signalman/tower operator was friendly, and allowed me to spend several hours photographing trains from the tower.

This was before VIA rationalized its schedules, and there was a constant parade of trains coming and going. Here, I’ve used the tower door to frame an inbound LRC train.

I didn’t think much of the modern LRC trains at the time. But I’m glad I preserved them on film.

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This week I’ll be photographing at the North Carolina Transportation Museum’s Streamliners at Spencer event. For a sneak preview see last night’s post. (CLICK HERE)

Keep an eye out for updates!

Spencer, North Carolina.

Spencer, North Carolina.

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Streamliners at Spencer—Sneak Preview—TRACKING THE LIGHT SPECIAL

In the Evening Glow—May 28, 2014.

Amtrak 79 Carolinian at Salisbury, North Carolina on the former Southern Railway. Lumix LX3 photo.

Amtrak 79 Carolinian at Salisbury, North Carolina on the former Southern Railway. Lumix LX-7 photo.

We arrived on Amtrak 79 at Salisbury, North Carolina only 63 minutes behind the advertised.

Within a few minutes of our arrival we were afforded a glimpse of the streamliners event. I had my first ever view of an Alco PA. I’m happy.

Former Santa Fe Alco PA diesel-electric dressed in the classic Nickel Plate Road livery. Spencer Shops, North Carolina. May 28, 2014. Lumix LX-7 photo.

Former Santa Fe Alco PA diesel-electric dressed in the classic Nickel Plate Road livery. North Carolina Transportation Museum’s Spencer Shops, North Carolina. May 28, 2014. Lumix LX-7 photo.

More to come tomorrow!

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CNW_411-Wabash_1189_lo_tight_P1020877

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Amtrak’s Carolinian at Richmond—On the way to Spencer—Part 5

Heat Curtailment, Crew Change, and a Trash Train.

Amfleet_interior_Carolinian_P1020756

Hmm, sounds like the chorus to a song. It was cool and damp when Amtrak’s Carolinian departed Trenton a little after 8am this morning (May 28, 2014). Now, its 94 degrees Fahrenheit outside!

We’ve been traveling at a reduced speed because of the heat. An customer (passenger?) announcement was made in this regard, shortly after we crossed the diamonds at Doswell (historically where the Chesapeake & Ohio crossed the Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac).

There’s lots of CSX freight on the line, if not moving particularly fast.

Amtrak's streamliner-era Budd-baggage car on train 79 at RIchmond, Virginia at 1:31 pm May 28, 2014. Lumix LX-7 photo.

Amtrak’s streamliner-era Budd-baggage car on train 79 at Richmond, Virginia at 1:31 pm May 28, 2014. Lumix LX-7 photo.

At Richmond, Staple Mills Station, we stopped for a crew change and a ‘smoke brake’. (If burning through the pixels with the LX-7 counts as ‘smoke,’ I’m in.)

A northward CSX trash train with an AC6000CW was parked near the head-end of Amtrak 79, Carolinian. It was a bit of shock to step out of the air-conditioned Amfleet car and into the heat.

Amtrak 79's crew change at Richmond. Lumix LX-7 photo.

Amtrak 79′s crew change at Richmond. Lumix LX-7 photo.

CSX AC6000CW leads an empty trash train bound for The Bronx at Staples Mills Station, Richmond, Virginia. Lumix LX-7 photo.

CSX AC6000CW leads an empty trash train bound for The Bronx at Staples Mills Station, Richmond, Virginia. Lumix LX-7 photo.

The AC6000CW features a pronounce radiator overhang that helps identify this locomotive. For a number of years these machines were common on the Boston & Albany route. Today, I saw no less than three in Richmond. Exposed on May 28, 2014 with a Lumix LX-7.

The AC6000CW features a pronounce radiator overhang that helps identify this locomotive. For a number of years these machines were common on the Boston & Albany route. Today, I saw no less than three in Richmond. Exposed on May 28, 2014 with a Lumix LX-7.

Among the features of the Panasonic Lumix LX-7 is a ‘digital zoom’ which allows for the effect of a much longer lens than offered optically. While this is really simply cropping in on the sensor, it does make photos like this one possible on site. I used the digital zoom as a composition tool, but I made another image the limits of the optical zoom as well. What I like about this long-telephoto angle is the signals to the right and the picket-fence effect of the canopy supports on the left. LX-7 photo.

Among the features of the Panasonic Lumix LX-7 is a ‘digital zoom’ which allows for the effect of a much longer lens than offered optically. While this is really simply cropping in on the sensor, it does make photos like this one possible on site. I used the digital zoom as a composition tool, but I made another image the limits of the optical zoom as well. What I like about this long-telephoto angle is the signals to the right and the picket-fence effect of the canopy supports on the left. LX-7 photo.

Our baggage car belongs to the streamlined era. Appropriate, since we are going to the North Carolina Transportation Museum’s Streamliners at Spencer event. Later this year I’ll be writing a book on American railroad’s streamlined era to be published by Voyageur Press!

More to come!

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