Tag Archives: Light rail

Los Angeles Green Line at LAX

After arrival at LAX (Los Angeles International Airport), I made my way to the Metrorail light rail station.

You have to take the LAX ‘G’ bus to get there.

Buying the fare took a bit of skill.

This photo was exposed in ‘Scene-mode, night photo’. It is a composite image created digitally.

Once up on the platforms, which are elevated high above ground level at the Aviation-LAX station, I made a few photos of passing trains using my tired and battle work LUMIX LX7. Then I boarded a Green Line train to change for the Blue.

I processed these photos using  Adobe Lightroom.

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Is this the Slowest Light Rail Line in North America?

My father and I were surprised at the glacial speed of MBTA’s Commonwealth Avenue line when we rode from Park Street to Boston College and back last May.

Must Boston’s streetcars travel so slowly? By comparison take Prague’s nimble trams that whisk passengers through the city’s streets. There’s a lesson to be learned.

Pedestrians observe MBTA streetcars near the Boston College terminus in June 2016. Exposed using a Lumix LX7.
Pedestrians observe MBTA streetcars near the Boston College terminus in June 2016. Exposed using a Lumix LX7.
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Tata Tram in Prague, Czech Republic, October 2016. Exposed on Ilford HP5 (ISO 400) using a Canon EOS-3 with 40mm pancake lens.

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Gold Line with Skyline—Los Angeles Metro Rail.

Metrolink runs the Los Angeles-area heavy rail commuter/suburban services. Metro Rail runs LA’s subway and light rail lines.

Earlier this month (August 2016), I made some views of the Gold Line extension to Atlantic from First Street. This offers some nice views of the cars with downtown Los Angeles skyline.

Looking east toward Atlantic. Gold Line's Pico/Aliso stop can be seen in the distance. (Not to be confused with Pico on the Blue Line/Expo Line that is located southwest of downtown. Just in case you were confused).
Looking east toward Atlantic. Gold Line’s Pico/Aliso stop can be seen in the distance. (Not to be confused with Pico on the Blue Line/Expo Line that is located southwest of downtown. Just in case you were confused).
This trailing view of an in bound Gold Line set was made with a slightly wide-angle focal length using my FujiFilm X-T1.
This trailing view of an in bound Gold Line set was made with a slightly wide-angle focal length using my FujiFilm X-T1.
Here's the same light rail train exposed from the same vantage point, but using a telephoto focal length, which compresses the distance and allows for the skyscrapers to visually loom above the road.
Here’s the same light rail train exposed from the same vantage point, but using a telephoto focal length, which compresses the distance and allows for the skyscrapers to visually loom above the road. A secondary benefit from this perspective is that it crops out the high-voltage wires that featured prominently in the earlier view. (Not so good, of course, if  you are a wire enthusiast!)

To pull in the skyline, I used a telephoto lens, which makes the buildings seem larger when compared to the light rail cars. When taken to extremes this effect can make the skyscrapers appear surreal.

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Metro Rail Expo Line; Light Rail under Sunny Skies—Los Angeles, August 2016.

I was keen to explore one of the Los Angeles-area’s most recent light rail extensions:  Metro Rail’s so-called Expo Line that runs west from a connection with the Blue Line (near downtown) and roughly follows the alignment of an old Pacific Electric route along Exposition Boulevard to Santa Monica.

The portion of the line from Culver City to Santa Monica was opened in May this year, and so still has that newly-built appearance.

LA Metro Rail pays tribute to the old Pacific Electric at its stations with artwork and historical interludes.

Attention to the platform art will yield the viewer bits of history and PE Heritage.
Attention to the platform art will yield the viewer bits of history and PE heritage.

Using my Lumix LX7 and FujiFilm X-T1 I made these images under bright sunny skies. Yet, I wonder about the opportunities for evening and twilight images on this line?

The Expo Line’s largely east-west alignment combined with LA’s propensity for air-pollution should present some impressive lighting conditions.

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I’m not the first observer to embrace the pictorial effects of Los Angeles air quality.

Perhaps a visit with a very long lens during a smog alert could yield some colorful results?

A telephoto view exposed with my FujiFilm X-T1 of a modern light rail car approaching Santa Monica.
A telephoto view exposed with my FujiFilm X-T1 of a modern light rail car approaching Santa Monica.
The Expo Line features a variety of light rail equipment, which is an uncommon feature for such a new line. Exposed at Santa Monica with my FujiFilm X-T1
The Expo Line features a variety of light rail equipment, which is an uncommon feature for such a new line. Exposed at Santa Monica with my FujiFilm X-T1
Many stations are decorated with artwork and embellished with historical tidbits. Exposed with my FujiFilm X-T1
Many stations are decorated with artwork and embellished with historical tidbits. Exposed with my FujiFilm X-T1
Expo Line station at Santa Monica.
Expo Line station at Santa Monica.
A Lumix LX7 view of an LA-bound car departing Santa Monica.
A Lumix LX7 view of an LA-bound car departing Santa Monica.
Trailing view of the same cars.
Trailing view of the same cars. Metro Rail is advertising the Expo Line on the side of this car.
An old car in new paint graces the streets of Santa Monica. LX7 photo.
An old car in new paint graces the streets of Santa Monica. LX7 photo.
Clean new signs are a feature of the Expo Line extension.
Clean new signs are a feature of the Expo Line extension.
Outbound cars at Jefferson. Lumix LX7 photo.
Outbound cars at Jefferson. Lumix LX7 photo.
Jefferson; cars stop just long enough to make a photo before boarding.
Jefferson; cars stop just long enough to make a photo before boarding. This one is 1027; do YOU remember the significance of that number?

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At Pico, the Expo Line shares platforms with the Blue Line (that runs to Long Beach). Careful, you might board the wrong car!
At Pico, the Expo Line shares platforms with the Blue Line (that runs to Long Beach). Careful, you might board the wrong car outbound!
Pico looking toward downtown LA. Lumix LX7 view.
Pico looking toward downtown LA. Lumix LX7 view.

For more on the Expo Line see this article in the LA Times:

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-expo-line-speed-snap-story.html

Also see: https://www.metro.net/riding/maps/

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Kenosha, Wisconsin PCCs—July 2016.

Earlier this week John Gruber and I visited Kenosha, Wisconsin to ride and photograph the vintage PCC streetcars that serve the town.

The cars are beautifully maintained; the line is short but interesting. Cars operated about every 15 minutes during the day. The fare is just $1.00—a true bargain.

On the downside, it is a bit difficult to figure out how and where to board the cars. A little bit of targeted advertising would go a long way.

During our short visit the weather was fantastic.

For more information on Kenosha’s cars see: http://www.kenoshastreetcarsociety.org

To order the book on American streetcars that John and I authored see:  American Streetcars.

Exposed with a FujiFilm X-T1.
Exposed with a FujiFilm X-T1.
Exposed with a FujiFilm X-T1.
Exposed with a FujiFilm X-T1.

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NJ Transit Hudson-Bergen Light Rail; My Jersey City Gallery, 8 photos.

I arrived in Jersey City on NJ Transit’s Hudson-Bergen Light Rail a few days ago. While I was checking out some comparative ‘now and then’ locations, I made these photos of the modern cars with my Lumix LX7.

NJT_Hudson_Bergen_light_rail_Harsimus_Cove_P1350295Hudson-Bergen_lightrail_Jersey_City_P1350331Morris_Canal_plaque_P1350329Hudson-Bergen_lightrail_Jersey_City_P1350335Hudson-Bergen_lightrail_Jersey_City_P1350322Hudson-Bergen_lightrail_Jersey_City_P1350316Hudson-Bergen_lightrail_Jersey_City_P1350336Hudson-Bergen_lightrail_Jersey_City_P1350343

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Newark Light Rail—June 2015

I was on my way from Gladstone to Cranford, New Jersey. During my change of modes at Newark Broad Street, I made this photo of an in-inbound NJ Transit light rail car.

It was hot, and the light was tinted by the prevailing smaze, a condition often prevalent in this part of New Jersey.

Question: would it be better to filter the light to counter the tint, or run with a ‘daylight’ setting that would show the brownish tinge the way it really is?

Broad Street in Newark, New Jersey. Exposed with a Lumix LX7.
Broad Street in Newark, New Jersey. Exposed with a Lumix LX7.

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Riding the Tide: Norfolk, Virginia’s Light Rail.

  • In the last couple of decades, a number of North American cities have adopted light rail as a preferred mode of public transport.Personally, I don’t make distinctions between light rail lines, streetcar lines, interurban electric lines, and/or trolley lines, since all use essentially the same technology with minor variations in the way they are adapted.
  • Exposed with a Lumix LX7.
    Exposed with a Lumix LX7.
  • Ground level view along Plume Street in Norfolk. Exposed using my Fujifilm X-T1 which has an adjustable rear display that facilitates holding the camera at a very low angle without requiring a chiropractic visit afterwards.
    Ground level view along Plume Street in Norfolk. Exposed using my Fujifilm X-T1 which has an adjustable rear display that facilitates holding the camera at a very low angle without requiring a chiropractic visit afterwards.

    In early June, in between other Virginia-based rail-events, Pat Yough and I made a brief visit to Norfolk, Virginia to take a spin on that city’s new light rail system, which is cleverly called ‘The Tide.’

    Nice Siemens trams (light rail vehicles) glide along on regular intervals. Part of the route is built on an old railroad right of way. It is my understanding that plans are in the works to extend the route east toward Virginia Beach.

  • For four dollars you can Ride the Tide all day, and, if you so choose, take a bus ride too.
    For four dollars you can Ride the Tide all day, and, if you so choose, take a bus ride too.
    A map of the Tide in downtown Norfolk. Lumix LX7 photo.
    A map of the Tide in downtown Norfolk. Lumix LX7 photo.
    The Tide taking the turn on Bank Street. Fujifilm X-T1 photo.
    The Tide taking the turn on Bank Street. Fujifilm X-T1 photo.
    Lumix LX7 photo.
    Norfolk, Virginia is a tidy city. Plume Street. Lumix LX7 photo.
    At least one of the trams was dressed in a special livery. Lumix LX7 photo.
    At least one of the trams was dressed in a special livery. Lumix LX7 photo.
    At the east-end of the line. Old railroad tracks continue beyond this point and may someday carry the Tide further east.
    At the east-end of the line. Old railroad tracks continue beyond this point and may someday carry the Tide further east.
    Tide rules. Lumix LX7 photo.
    Tide rules. Lumix LX7 photo.
    Riding the Tide. Lumix LX7 photo.
    Riding the Tide. Lumix LX7 photo.

    Tide seats. Lumix LX7 photo.
    Tide seats. Lumix LX7 photo.
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Hudson-Bergen Light Rail.

Seven photos of a reincarnated railway.

NJ Transit’s Hudson-Bergen Light Rail has been on my photo list for more than a decade. It’s one of those things that is close enough to be just out of reach.

When an operation is under threat, time is made—found—to photograph it. You know, before its gone. But when something isn’t going anywhere, its often easy to ignore.

Such was my failings in photographing the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail. Thanks to a detailed tour with Jack May on January 15, 2015, I’ve finally explored of this interesting operation.

Canon EOS 7D photo.
Canon EOS 7D photo.
This simplified map of the system is posted in all of the cars. Canon EOS 7D photo.
This simplified map of the system is posted in all of the cars. Canon EOS 7D photo.
Hoboken terminal, which the light rail serves via  stub-end spur.
Hoboken terminal, which the light rail serves via stub-end spur.

This compact modern passenger railway operates on a selection of former heavy-rail railroad rights of way, including through the old New York, West Shore & Buffalo tunnel at Weekhawken.

The day was ideal; sunny and bright with clear skies. We first rode north from Hoboken to Tonnelle Avenue, then worked our way back south through Jersey City to Bayonne visiting a variety of stations along the way.

All along the line are modern buildings. I was pleased to find that ridership was very good, even during midday. This follows the idiom of: 'Build and they will come.'
All along the line are modern buildings. I was pleased to find that ridership was very good, even during midday. This follows the maxim of: ‘Build and they will come.’
A view looking back toward Weekhawken. As a kid I was fascinated by the Palisades.
A view looking back toward Weekhawken. As a kid I was fascinated by the Palisades.

Much of the route passed through places that I recalled from adventures with my father in the 1970s and early 1980s. The Jersey waterfront was different place back then.

What had been rotting wharves, badly maintained freight trackage, and post-industrial squalor is now all up-scale housing, modern office towers, and otherwise new construction. It was familiar, yet different—like some weird vision of the future.

The 8th Street Station is located at the south end of the system in Bayonne. Canon EOS 7D photo.
The 8th Street Station is located at the south end of the system in Bayonne. Canon EOS 7D photo.
A portion of the line running toward 8th Street runs along the right of way of the old Central Railroad of New Jersey  four track mainline—once the route of the Queen of the Valley, Reading's Crusader, and Baltimore & Ohio's Royal Blue and Capitol Limited. I may have missed all of that, but my father has a few choice photos from those days. Canon EOS 7D photo.
A portion of the line running toward 8th Street usesgthe right of way of the old Central Railroad of New Jersey four track mainline—once the route of the Queen of the Valley, Reading’s Crusader, and Baltimore & Ohio’s Royal Blue and Capitol Limited. I may have missed all of that, but my father has a few choice photos from those days. Canon EOS 7D photo.

In addition to these digital photos made with my Canon EOS 7D, I also exposed many color slides on Provia 100F with my EOS 3 for review at later date.

The Katyn massacre memorial is located near Exchange Place across from lower Manhattan. Many years ago, Pennsylvania Railroad operated an extensive terminal near this very location with a cavernous balloon style shed patterned after London St. Pancras.
The Katyn massacre memorial is located near Exchange Place across from lower Manhattan and a short walk from the light rail line. Many years ago, Pennsylvania Railroad operated an extensive terminal near this location that featured a cavernous balloon style shed patterned after London St. Pancras. My father brought us to the site of the old terminal in the early 1980s-even then there wasn’t much to remind us of the glory days.

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Tracking the Light Daily Post: German Tram-Train at Dusk

Karlsruhe, Germany, May 2011.

Dawn and dusk are great times to make urban images where there’s a mix of natural and artificial light.

The reduced amount of daylight and the change in color temperature helps control contrast, simplifies exposure, while making for a more dramatic image.

I exposed this view of a tram train under the shed at Karlsruhe on the evening of May 11, 2011 using my Lumix LX-3.

The Germany tram train system allows specially designed light rail cars to share tracks with mainline trains. The system greatly benefits passengers and maximizes the use of the railway network.
The Germany tram train system allows specially designed light rail cars to share tracks with mainline trains. The system greatly benefits passengers and maximizes the use of the railway network.

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Tomorrow: Dusk and an annoying cone!

 

Daily Post: If you Say Something, See Something.

San Francisco, August 2009.

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DAILY POST: Panned View, Buffalo, New York.

Sunny Morning on Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority Metro Rail.

Buffalo Light Rail
A Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority Tokyu Car-built light rail car glides through downtown Buffalo on May 4, 1989. The brown strip along the side of the car compares nicely with the tint of the stone on St Paul’s beyond. Since this image was exposed, NFTA has dressed the cars in a more modern livery.

I’d argue that the Buffalo light rail line is one of America’s least photographed railways. It’s certainly not something I’ve often seen pictured.

The system has several peculiarities. One of the strangest is its route, which runs in a subway through the northern Buffalo suburbs but on the street in the historic downtown.

I’ve made several visits to photograph and ride this unusual railway. I had an especially  clear morning on May 4, 1989 when I exposed this pan on Kodachrome with my Leica M2. The car is on Main Street and passing St Paul’s Cathedral (located just a few blocks from Buffalo City Hall).

When seeking out railways to document, I’m always on the lookout for those operations that appear to elude other photographers. Admittedly, while the Buffalo light rail isn’t the most exciting railway in western New York, it can be photogenic and is thus worthy of pictures.

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LUAS at the Red Cow April 2005

400mm View of an Alstom Citadis Tram.

LUAS tram
Dublin LUAS tram backlit near the Red Cow stop in April 2005. Exposed on Fujichrom Sensia 100 with a Nikon N90S fitted with a Tokina 400mm lens.

In April 2005, Dublin’s LUAS light rail system was still relatively new. Services on the Red Line service between Dublin Connolly Station and Tallagh had only commenced the previous September.

The Trams still had that ‘right out of the box’ quality. They were new and shiny and free from dents and day-to-day wear and tear. The yellow safety stripes were still in the future.

The Irish Railway Record Society was working on a special LUAS edition of their Journal and fellow IRRS members Stephen Hirsch, the late-Norman McAdams and myself spent a morning intensively photographing LUAS operations and its trams to help fill this publication.

The morning was bright but had a hazy diffused quality of light, typical of Irish April weather. I exposed this image with my Nikon N90S fitted with a Tokina 400mm lens.

However when I inspected the processed slide, it left me with something of quandary: While I was satisfied with the composition and the subtle backlit qualities, I’d felt that I’d misjudged the lighting and overexposed the image by about a stop. Worse, I didn’t manage to keep the camera level, so, by my normal standards of judgment, I felt the slide projected poorly.

Despite these flaws, I found the slide, scanned exceptionally well. In post processing I was easily able to correct for level, and the exposure looks fine on the computer screen without need for manipulation.

This just goes to show what doesn’t look good on film, may, in fact, produce a better than average final image in other media.

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San Francisco Muni Light Rail.

Breda Light Rail Vehicles Work San Francisco Streets.

Muni Light Rail

Shortly after sunset in May 2008, a San Francisco Muni L-Taraval car takes the corner from 15th Avenue to Ulloa Street on the way toward West Portal, where the line enters the Twin Peaks Tunnel. Exposed on Fujichrome with a Canon EOS 3 with f28 200mm lens. Eighteen years earlier I made a similar view near this spot, which appeared in an issue of Passenger Train Journal in the 1990s.

Although less photographed than historic cable cars and vintage streetcars, San Francisco Muni’s light rail routes offer plenty of interesting opportunities to make urban railway images.

San Francisco Muni
The sun rises through a thick bank of Pacific fog as N-Judah cars pass on August 27, 2009. This was exposed on Fujichrome slide film with my Canon EOS 3 fitted with a 100-400mm image stabilization zoom lens.

San Francisco enjoys spectacular weather and lighting conditions. My favorite times to photograph are a sunrise and sunset. While the modern Breda-built cars lack the flair of historic PCC’s (see San Francisco Muni F-Line, May 2008), they still make for interesting subjects for the creative eye.

 

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Purple Ad Tram on LUAS Green Line

Spring Colors for Dublin Transport.

Harcourt Street, April 3, 2013.
Harcourt Street, April 3, 2013.

The other evening I was at birthday party in Dublin’s old Harcourt Street Station where I noticed the passing of a purple advertising tram. Wednesday, April 3, 2013 dawned clear and bright, so during the course of my day, I took a spin down the LUAS Green Line, and intercepted this latest ad tram. I exposed digital photos with my Lumix LX3, while making a few slides with my old Nikon F3.

Alstom Citadis Tram
Alstom Citadis Tram in advertising livery arrives at Kilmacud on the LUAS Green Line, April 3, 2013.

Purple_tram_St_Stephens_Green_P1450661_3

Alstom Citadis Tram
LUAS Alstom Citadis Tram seen at St Stephens Green, Dublin.
LUAS Alstom Citadis Tram seen at St Stephens Green, Dublin.
LUAS Alstom Citadis Tram seen at St Stephens Green, Dublin.

I’ll be presenting my illustrated talk “Ireland through American Eyes 1998-2008 My first Decade in Ireland” to the London area Irish Railway Record Society on April 18, 2013.

The program begins at 1900 (7pm) upstairs at the Exmouth Arms, 1 Starcross Street, LONDON NW1, (advertised as a 5 minute walk from London’s Euston station). A nominal donation of £3.50 is asked of non-IRRS members (members £2.50)

For more on the IRRS see: http://www.irrs.ie/

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White Tram Prowls Dublin’s LUAS

LUAS tram
White tram at Bus Aras, Dublin. February 19, 2013. Canon 7D with 40mm pancake lens.

 

White tram near Bus Aras, Dublin. February 19, 2013. Canon 7D with 40mm pancake lens.
White tram near Bus Aras, Dublin. February 19, 2013. Canon 7D with 40mm pancake lens.

The majority of trams on Dublin’s LUAS network are dressed in light silvery lavender with yellow safety strips around the body of the cars roughly at headlight level. The yellow stripe was added after the 2004 LUAS start up. Every so often, a single tram is decorated in an advertising livery. Last autumn (2012) there was an attractive blue tram advertising a cable television service. The other day, I noticed an all white tram advertising a phone service. This is like the one red jellybean in a bag of black ones. It’s something to watch out for and relieves the monotony of an otherwise uniform fleet. For photography it opens up opportunity to catch something a little different. After all, what can white do that silver cannot?

LUAS tram Dublin
Ordinary LUAS tram catches the glint at Bus Aras, Dublin. February 19, 2013. Canon 7D with 40mm pancake lens.
LUAS Tram, Dublin
White tram at Connolly Station, Dublin. February 19, 2013. Canon 7D with 40mm pancake lens.

 

Tram in Dublin
White tram on Benburb Street Dublin. February 19, 2013. Canon 7D with 40mm pancake lens.

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Toronto, February 8, 2010

Braving frigid temperatures to take advantage of incredible low-light; on this day, three years ago (February 8, 2010), Pat Yough, Chris Guss & I were in Toronto photographing in suitably arctic conditions. Cold but clear—there’s a fantastic, surreal quality of light in sub-zero temperatures which can lead to great images if you chose to endure the conditions. Not, only were we up early, but the night before we spent an hour or more making night shots from the Bathurst Street Bridge. It didn’t get any warmer by daybreak, which we photographed from the lake front west of the city center. On that morning, after setting up the tripod, my numb hands only managed to record in my note book, “0646 [6:46 am]—ugg. Twilight—cold.”

View from Bathurst Street, Toronto approaching Midnight on February 7, 2010. Lumix LX-3 time exposure.
View from Bathurst Street, Toronto approaching Midnight on February 7, 2010. Lumix LX-3 time exposure.
Sunrise on Lake Ontario, February 8, 2010. Lumix LX-3 on tripod.
Sunrise on Lake Ontario, February 8, 2010. Lumix LX-3 on tripod.

While we made an intense tour of Toronto area railroading, among the most memorable images were those exposed toward the end of daylight near Queensway & King Streets along the Canadian National quad-track line west of Union Station. This is one of the busiest lines in Canada, and hosts a flurry of trains at rush hour. For me the highlight was a pair of in-bound GO Transit trains with new MP40PHs running side-by-side as the sun hugged the horizon over lake Ontario. A few minutes later, I scored a VIA train gliding under a signal bridge in last glint of sunlight. At the time, I was still working primarily with film, and I kept both Canon EOS-3s busy. One was fitted with my 100-400 IS zoom, the other with a 24mm AF lens. The only digital camera I had was my Lumix LX-3, which I learned tends to chew through battery power in sub-zero conditions. By the end of the day, I’d drained three full batteries. The McDonalds on King Street made for a nice place to thaw hands on cups of hot chocolate while watching TTC’s trams glide by at dusk. On the way back we swung by Niagara Falls, my first visit to the famous waterfall, despite having photographed trains crossing the gorge on several occasions over the years.

GO Transit.
Eastward GO Transit trains near Sunnyside at sunset on February 8, 2010. Canon EOS-3 with 100-400 zoom; Fujichrome RVP-100, exposure not recorded.
GO Transit.
Eastward GO Transit trains near Sunnyside at sunset on February 8, 2010. Canon EOS-3 with 24mm lens; Fujichrome RVP-100, exposure not recorded.
VIA Rail at sunset.
Eastward VIA Rail train approaches Sunnyside at sunset on February 8, 2010. Canon EOS-3 with 100-400 zoom; Fujichrome RVP-100, exposure not recorded.
View of TTC streetcar on King Street from McDonalds on corner of Roncesvalles Avenue and Queen  at dusk on February 8, 2010. Lumix LX-3 ISO 80 at f2.8.
View of TTC streetcar on King Street from McDonalds on corner of Roncesvalles Avenue and Queen at dusk on February 8, 2010. Lumix LX-3 ISO 80 at f2.8.
TTC Streetcar Toronto.
TTC Streetcar at corner of King and Queen Streets, Sunnyside, Toronto, February 8, 2010.
Lumix LX-3 set at ISO 80.
Niagara Falls at night in winter.
Time exposure of Niagara Falls from the Ontario side. Exposed digitally with a Lumix LX-3 on a Bogan tripod.

 

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Dublin’s Harcourt Street at Dusk

Dublin's Harcourt Street
Harcourt Street looking north on a rainy March 1998 evening; Nikon F3T with 50mm Nikkor Lens, Fujichrome 64T slide film. Exposed manually with aid of a Sekonic Studio Deluxe hand-held light meter. This image appears on pages 184-185 of my book Dublin, published by Compendium in 2008.

There are very few places where I my memory predates the railway. However, Dublin‘s LUAS tram system (opened in 2004) offers one example. I made my first photos of Harcourt Street in March 1998. It was a rainy evening, and I was experimenting with some tungsten balanced Fujichrome to enhance the blue twilight glow.

LUAS on Harcourt St IMG_0887©Brian Solomon
On November 3, 2010, a LUAS Green Line Tram bound for St. Stephens Green navigates Dublin’s Harcourt Street. Canon 7D with 28-135mm lens set at 130mm, ISO 1250 1/40th sec f5.7.

Moving a dozen years forward, on November 3, 2010 I was interested in replicating the effect of my earlier efforts (without any attempt at precisely recreating the scene; my 1998 photo was made from the south-end of the street looking north, while the 2010 image was from the north-end, looking south). The image of the tram was made with my Canon 7D with the 28-135mm lens. Here, the tungsten color balance was accomplished in-camera using the ‘light bulb’ white balance setting. (See: Steam at Dusk, December 15, 2012) . This image was made during the final glow of daylight, and rather than neutralize the bluish light by using the auto white balance setting, I opted to enhance the effect while offering adequate compensation for the warm-balance street lamps. I was particularly drawn to reflections in the street and the repeating window frame patterns in the Georgian buildings above the tram. The pedestrian silhouettes seem apropos for the time of year; here past meets present.

 

 

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