Tag Archives: Portugal

Low Angle Telephoto View: Ovar, Portugal.


To make for a more dramatic photograph, I used my FujiFilm XT1 with the rear-display tilted skyward, which allowed me place the camera at platform level.

The display’s heads-up detail includes exposure and a leveling information that makes it easier to set the camera and expose at arm’s length.

Standing on the platform of Portuguese Railway’s passenger station at Ovar (south of Porto on the Porto-Lisbon mainline), I made this view using a fixed focal-length (not a variable focal length zoom) 90mm telephoto. This lens and angle compresses the scene, lowers the depth of field, and owing to the relative proximity to the ground and focus on the trains minimizes the foreground.


Tracking the Light Posts Daily!

Lisbon Oriente at Night.


Lisbon Oriente was designed by Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava and opened in the early 2000s.

I made these nocturnal photos handheld with my FujiFilm XT1 with 90mm prime lens set at 1/15 at f2 ISO 6400.

The combination of high ISO made possible by modern digital cameras and a fast telephoto lens enabled me to make photos that had been virtually impossible with old Kodachrome slide film.

Not only was Kodachrome slow, but it had very poor reciprocity failure which made it difficult to calculate night exposure, and it didn’t respond well to artificial light.

Tracking the Light Posts Daily.

Beautiful Station at Santarem, Portugal.


Many Portuguese railway stations are decorated with elaborate blue tile murals. These are considered national treasures.

Santarem station is a wonderful example and features more than a dozen unique murals. This is a busy station on the Lisbon-Porto mainline and makes for a great place to watch and photograph trains.

On the day we visited it was overcast, which aided exposing photos of the murals under the canopy of the station that may have been shadowed on a sunny day.

Photos exposed in March using FujiFilm and Lumix digital cameras.

Tracking the Light Posts Daily!

Crazy places to put tracks!

Lisbon trams—Part 2.

Old four wheel cars and ancient buildings are part of the attraction to Lisbon’s antique tram network, but for me the best part are the crazy track arrangements.

This network has some of the most extreme trackage of any railway in the world relying on adhesion principles for traction. In other words: no racks, cogs or cables.

I exposed these black & white views with my Nikon F3 on 1 April 2019 while exploring Lisbon with fellow photographer Denis McCabe.

What better way to spend April Fool’s Day?

Tracking the Light Posts Every Day!

Lisbon: narrow streets and trams—Part 1.


This could be a book, or at least part of one.

Lisbon is visually intense and everywhere I looked I saw photos to be made.

This is the first is multi-part series of photos that I made on Lisbon streets on 1 April 2019.

Exposed on Fuji Acros 100 with a Nikon F3, processed in Rodinal.

Tracking the Light posts every day!

Narrow Gauge to Light Rail: Senhora da Hora.


A significant portion of Porto’s modern light rail Metro system is built on the right of way of an historic narrow gauge network.

In March 2019, photographer Denis McCabe and I visited the old station at Senhora da Hora in suburban Porto. The station building an a water tower survive, providing visual clues of operations from former times.

Tracking the Light is on ‘auto pilot’ while Brian is traveling.

Porto Metro at Trindade.


In contrast to my April 2014 visit to Porto’s Trindade station , where I remember horizontal rain blowing into the covered over portions of the platforms, my more recent visit was under clear sunny skies.

Trindade is a busy junction station where Porto Metro lines interface with each other.

At the northeastern end of the top level, Metro tracks exit the station into an open area while taking a remarkably tight curve before plunging into a tunnel below the city.

I exposed these views using my ‘new’ Lumix LX7 on a visit to Porto in late March 2019.

Photos were exposed in ‘A’ mode, which allows me to set the lens aperture manually with the camera selecting a corresponding shutter speed to obtain the ideal exposure.


Tracking the Light Posts Every Day.

GM Powered Diesel Leads Portuguese Timber Train.


Most of the Portuguese main line network is electrified, which makes diesel hauled trains something of a novelty.

Among the regular diesel hauled trains are freights by Portuguese open access operator Takargo, such as this one led by a Vossloh-built Euro 4000 diesel-electric locomotive.

This unusual looking machine sounds familiar since it is powered by a General Motors Electro-Motive Division designed 12 cylinder 710 diesel engine. The Euro 4000 is a cousin of Ireland’s 201 class locomotive and the America F59PHI, also powered by variations of the 12-710.

I made these photos from the platforms at Porto Campanha.

Lumix LX7 photo.

FujiFilm XT1 photo.


Tracking the Light Posts Daily!

Aregos, Portugal: English Electric diesel hauled passenger train.


The scenic Douro Valley is legend as one Portugal’s great places to ride and photograph trains.

On our brief visit to the valley last week, Denis McCabe and took positions on the south side of the river to photograph regularly scheduled passenger trains that for a short time were being hauled by vintage English Electric diesels.

What’s so special about diesel-hauled passenger trains? Not only do the English Electric engines represent a throw-back to an earlier era, but by-in-large Portuguese Railways are electrified and/or host passenger multiple units in place of diesel locomotive hauled trains.

I made these photos using my FujiFIlm XT1 with 90mm lens.

Tracking the Light Posts Daily!

Eiffel Bridge: Porto’s Pont Luis I.

Porto boasts two large Eiffel bridges over the River Douro.

One is a disused railway bridge; the other is this one pictured— the famed Pont Luis I, which carries tram-operated Metro Line D and a pedestrian walkways on its top level and a road on the lower level.

I made this view with my Lumix LX7 from an alleyway east of the bridge.

Tracking the Light Posts Daily!

Electric Local at Valega, Portugal.


Under a clear sky with a blazing sun over my left shoulder, I made this view of a Comboios de Portugal (Portuguese Railways) local passenger train pausing for a station stop at Valega.

This small town benefits from a regular interval stopping passenger service on the busy double-track Lisbon-Porto mainline that hosts high-speed Alfa Pendolino, InterCity long distance, and lots of freight trains on the same rails.

Exposed using a FujiFilm XT1 with 90mm lens.

Tracking the Light Posts Daily!

Portuguese Railways’ English Electric Diesel Up Close.


Last Saturday, 30 March 2019, Denis McCabe and I navigated sinuous roads over the hills from the Douro Valley to Marco de Canaveses, Portugal in order to inspect one of Portuguese Railways’ vintage English Electric-built diesels that are temporarily assigned to scheduled passenger services on the scenic sections of the Douro Valley route to the east.

Locomotive 1455 restored in a retro-blue livery was laying over between runs at the Marco de Canaveses station. We had about 10 minutes to make photos, before we departed for the return drive to the Douro Valley to catch this machine at work.

I made these views using my Lumix LX7, but also exposed a few Fujichrome Provia 100F slides.

Tracking the Light Posts Daily.

Medway Electric Cement


Last week, Wednesday 27 March 2019, photographer Denis McCabe and I set up at a rural level crossing south of Pampilhosa, Portugal on the double-track electrified Lisbon-Porto mainline.

Several minutes before a train, warning bells would ring and lights would flash, giving us ample time to prepare for photographs.

The crossing is conveniently situated near the apex of curve in an S-bend.

Working with my FujiFilm XT1 with 27mm pancake lens, I exposed these photos of a Medway electric leading an empty cement train as it passed the crossing.

Tracking the Light Posts Daily!

First Foray in Portugal’s Supremely Scenic Douro Valley.


On the agenda for last week’s photographic adventure in Portugal was a venture into the Douro Valley.

In recent weeks line-works had resulted in a throw-back operation of regularly scheduled Douro Valley passenger services using vintage English Electric diesel hauled trains in place of diesel railcars.

[Translation: a limited opportunity to make photos of vintage trains in very scenic settings.]

Denis McCabe and I departed Porto in our hired car for a location I’d preselected the night before.

Google Maps provided the most direct (if not the shortest) route to a point south east of Aregos on the south bank of the river. Neither of us had ever been here before.

For me the Douro Valley resembles a populated version of California’s Feather River Canyon.

We made it just in time: shortly after our arrival we heard a diesel working up the valley. The cameras were hastily switched ‘on’, positions taken and photos made.

Exposed with a FujiFilm XT1 with 90mm lens.

Trailing view. Exposed with a FujiFilm XT1 with 90mm lens.
This is a much enlarged and cropped view of the photo above.

Special thanks to Tracking the Light reader and fellow photographer Stephen Hirsch who supplied us with up to date details on Douro Valley operations.

Not bad for our first minutes in the Douro Valley. But there’s more to come! Stay tuned . . . 

Northward Medway Freight, Pampilhosa, Portugal—A Lesson in Crossing Lighting.

Hopefully you see a full -colour landscape-orientation image of a Medway freight train.
This is a portrait-orientation view of a Medway freight train.


Here’s a visually challenging situation: a semi-gloss black locomotive with yellow lettering cross-lit by the afternoon sun.

‘Cross-lit’: when a train has the front lit by the primary light source (in this case the sun) while the side of the train remains on the ‘dark side’ (that opposite from the primary light source).

In certain situations cross lighting can be used for dramatic effect; in others it may be viewed as unfortunate or non-conventional.

At Pampilhosa, I found cross-lighting was a good way to show the scenery, the empty freight train, and the effects of overhead catenary.

But does this photo work?

Brian Solomon is traveling in Portugal and may not be able to respond promptly to questions or queries. Hopefully photos will display without difficulty.

Tracking the Light Posts Daily.

Stainless Steel and Sun at Porto Campanha—29 March 2019.

I made this view using my Lumix LX7 at Porto’s Campanha Station on Friday 29 March 2019. I’ve posted this using a wireless ‘hotspot’ connection from my MacBook to my iPhone. Apologies if the quality isn’t up to standards or if the photo doesn’t load quickly.

Porto Campanha, Portugal. (Normally there is a tilde over the second ‘a’ in Campanha.)
Porto Campanha, Portugal. (Normally there is a tilde over the second ‘a’ in Campanha.)

I’ve exposed hundreds of photos in Portugal over the last few days. It may take some time before I’ve had time to sort through every thing.

As I write this, I’m sitting on a hillside with fellow photographer Denis McCabe overlooking the supremely scenic Douro Valley awaiting the passage of an English Electric diesel-hauled passenger train, as per the recommendations of Tracking the Light reader Stephen Hirsch.

More to come!

Tracking the Light Posts Daily!

Portuguese Local Train on the Beira Alta at Trezoi—March 2019


Deep in a valley, far from main roads, Portuguese Railways’ Beira Alta line soars across the village of Trezoi.

This a quiet place and the rattle of the train on the bridge momentarily wakes the town.

Exposed using my FujiFilm XT1 with 27mm pancake lens.

Brian Solomon is traveling in Portugal.

Tracking the Light Posts Daily! 

Deep in a valley, far from main roads, Portuguese Railways’ Beira Alta line soars across the village of Trezoi.

Pendolino tilts at Pampilhosa!

I made this digital photo of a southward Portuguese Railways Pendolino train tilting through a curve at Pampilhosa using my FujiFilm XT1 with 27mm pancake lens.

This is trailing view looking south toward Pampilhosa Station. Portuguese track is textbook perfect.

Brian Solomon is traveling in Portugal so communication may be infrequent.

Tracking the Light continues to post daily.

Viaduct at Luso, Portugal—26 March 2019.

Yesterday afternoon, Denis McCabe and I arrived at the impressive viaduct at Luso, Portugal on the Beira Alta line that runs toward the Spanish frontier.

I made this view of Intercidades 513 crossing the bridge at Luso, Portugal on its way toward Guarda.

Traveling light on this trip, I only have three cameras with me and a mere four lenses.

More to come!

Brian Solomon’s Tracking the Light is on the road in Portugal.

Daily Posts!

Europe’s Most Photogenic Urban Railway? Five Photos—Lisbon Trams.

As far as transit is concerned, Lisbon is the San Francisco of Europe.

Ok, you can nitpick about the methods of propulsion, cables versus juice, but with steep hills, outstanding urban panoramas and quirky twisting trackage in narrow streets and fully functional antique cars, Lisbon’s tram system has lots in common with San Francisco’s famous cable cars.

These cities have lots of parallels too, certainly in layout and appearance, and weather.

I made these photos in the Portuguese capital on a brilliant day in April.

There’s seemingly endless opportunity for photographs. But do you work with the shadows or in the shadows?

Canon EOS 7D digital photo.

View from a Portuguese restaurant. Canon EOS 7D digital photo.

For the tourist, Lisbon’s trams are both transport and an attraction.

Lisbon is among the cities featured in my new book, Brian Solomon’s Railway Guide to Europe  available now from the Kalmbach Hobby Store.

https://kalmbachhobbystore.com/product/book/01304

You can also get my book on Amazon. If you like what you see, please give me a good review! Thanks!

Red trams make a special circuit for visitors. Canon EOS 7D digital photo.

Canon EOS 7D digital photo.

Tracking the Light Posts Daily.

Lisbon’s Trams.

April 6, 2014.

Back in 1996 a European friend said to me, ‘you ought to visit Lisbon, they’ve got some wonderful old trams there.’ Some 18 years later, I finally ticked off that box in my notebook. Better late, than not at all.

Lumix LX3 photo; Lisbon April 6, 2014.
Lumix LX3 photo; Lisbon April 6, 2014.

Lisbon is famous for its narrow gauge trams that crawl up narrow and steeply graded streets. This track work is amazing. It’s amazing that it was ever built, and even more so that some of the lines are still worked in 2014!

The old trams are of course a tourist attraction, but like San Francisco’s cable cars, these function as part of the transit system.

Visitors queue to board, much to the delight of local pickpockets. I was forewarned about light-fingered activities, so I took precautionary measures. And, also made a sport of spotting the picks. Not to point fingers, I saw nothing lifted, but I saw some suspicious characters in the queue (who didn’t seem to have any interest in riding a tram).

Steep gradients and colourful old buildings are part of the attraction of Lisbon's tram network. They wouldn't have the same charm serving suburban tower block apartments.
Steep gradients and colourful old buildings are part of the attraction of Lisbon’s tram network. They wouldn’t have the same charm serving suburban tower block apartments.

A tram works up hill by Lisbon's cathedral.
A tram works up hill by Lisbon’s cathedral. Canon EOS 7D photo.

The red trams worked a tourist route. Canon EOS 7D.
The red trams worked a tourist circuit. Canon EOS 7D. 

Lumix LX3 photo; Lisbon April 6, 2014. Tram traffic jam.
Lumix LX3 photo; Lisbon April 6, 2014. Tram traffic jam.

Lumix LX3 photo; Lisbon April 6, 2014.
Lumix LX3 photo; Lisbon April 6, 2014.

The quirky old cars are enhanced by the colorful tapestry that makes up Lisbon’s old city. Sunny skies were delivered as ordered.

Route number 15 is populated by modern LRV style cars, but passes through some interesting areas and runs parallel to an old heavy-rail commuter rail route.

Modern cars work line 15. Lumix LX3 photo; Lisbon April 6, 2014.
Modern cars work line 15.
Lumix LX3 photo; Lisbon April 6, 2014.

Trams tend to get bunched up in traffic and seem to appear in waves of three or four cars all at once. Canon EOS 7D with 200mm lens.
Trams tend to get bunched up in traffic and seem to appear in waves of three or four cars all at once. Canon EOS 7D with 200mm lens.

Narrow alleys have barely enough room for single track. Yet, this is a bidirectional line with cars and trucks too. Canon EOS 7D.
Narrow alleys have barely enough room for single track. Yet, this is a bidirectional line with cars and trucks too. Canon EOS 7D.

View from the door of a track-side cafe. Canon EOS 7D with 100 mm lens.
View from the door of a track-side cafe. Canon EOS 7D with 100 mm lens.

This car works interlaced track where up-hill and down hill lines overlap. Canon EOS 7D.
This car works interlaced track where up-hill and down hill lines overlap. Careful, mind the Volkswagen! Canon EOS 7D.

Tracking the Light posts new material every morning.

Please share Tracking the Light!

http://briansolomon.com/trackingthelight/

Tomorrow: Looking back on a Clocker.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Porto’s Metro

In the Rain and Underground.

Tram_bursting_out_of_Fog_Trindade_station_Porto_P1630253
Trindade Station, Porto. Exposed with a Lumix LX3.

Ah yes, sunny Portugal! Wall to wall blue skies . .  Er. . . wait, no, actually it was cool, dark, and pouring rain in Porto.

Portugal’s second city. As Cork is to Dublin; Porto is to Lisbon. And with a really long history too. The Romans were here a while back.

In 2002, Porto opened its Metro, which is what I’d call a trolley-subway. Or, tram-subway, if you prefer.

It is well patronized, and well run.

On the day I visited, it was also exceptionally wet! But heavy rain can make for interesting photos, so I made the most of the circumstances.

Trindade on Porto's Metro. Exposed with a Canon EOS 7D with 100mm lens.
Trindade on Porto’s Metro. Exposed with a Canon EOS 7D with 100mm lens.

Pan in the Metro. Canon EOS 7D.
Pan in the Metro. Canon EOS 7D.

Tram interior, exposed with a Lumix LX3.
Tram interior, exposed with a Lumix LX3.

At Senhora de Hora in the rain. Canon EOS 7D. My Canon didn't like the rain.
At Senhora de Hora in the rain. Canon EOS 7D. My Canon didn’t like the rain.

Seta Bicas. Canon EOS 7D.
Seta Bicas. Canon EOS 7D.

Bursting out of a tunnel near central Porto. Canon EOS 7D.
Gliding into a tunnel near central Porto. Canon EOS 7D.

Porto_tram_map_P1630229 Porto_tram_interior_P1630223

 Tomorrow: Porto and Paris have this in common . . . 

Tracking the Light posts new material every morning.

Please share Tracking the Light!

http://briansolomon.com/trackingthelight/

Enhanced by Zemanta

International Train Hotel-Entroncamento, Portugal

April 3, 2014.

Entroncamento Station, Portugal on the evening of April 3, 2014.
Entroncamento Station, Portugal on the evening of April 3, 2014.

Portugal shares the broad Iberian standard gauge with Spain: rails are five feet six inches apart. Despite this commonality, today there are relatively few international services between the two countries.

One of the few cross-border trains is the nightly combined Lusitania/Sud Expresso connecting Lisbon with Spanish cities. The Lusitania runs Lisbon-Madrid, while the Sud Expresso is a vestige of the old Wagon Lits luxury express that once connected Lisbon with Paris, but now only goes as far as Irun on the Spanish-French frontier.

The train operates with RENFE (Spanish Railways) TALGO train hotel equipment, which makes it anomalous compared with the majority of Portuguese passenger trains.

On April 3, 2014, I planned to photograph the eastward Lusitania/Sud Expresso (train 335/310) during its station stop at Entrocamento, Portugal.

This is a big station, adjacent to freight yards, shops, and Portugal’s National Railway Museum.

Portugal.
Entrocamento Station with the nightly Lisbon-Spain train hotel approaching in the distance. Exposed with a Lumix LX3 set at 80 ISO.

The train departed Lisbon Santa Apolónia at 9:18 pm, and arrived at Entroncamento a little more than an hour later. I had less than five minutes to make photographs.

I worked with three cameras. First exposing digital time exposures using my Lumix LX3 positioned on a mini Gitzo tripod. I made several images using my standard night photo technique (see: Lumix LX-3—part 2:  Existing Light Digital Night Shots).

Entrocamento Station with the nightly Lusitania/Sud Expresso paused for its station stop. Exposed with a Lumix LX3 set at 80 ISO. I used the self timer set at 2 seconds to minimize vibration.
Entrocamento Station with the nightly Lusitania/Sud Expresso paused for its station stop. Exposed with a Lumix LX3 set at 80 ISO. I used the self timer set at 2 seconds to minimize vibration.

Then I quickly swapped the Lumix for my Canon EOS 3 with 40mm lens loaded with Provia 100F, and made a three exposure bracket. With film, I find it difficult to gauge night exposures, so I aided my efforts with my handheld Minolta Mark IV light meter.

Provia 100F has a filtration layer that minimizes undesirable color spikes caused by fluorescent and sodium lighting.

In the middle of this time-exposure exercise, I also made several handheld images using my Canon EOS 7D set for a high ISO. I figured that covered most of the angles.

I exposed this view of the Lusitania/Sud Expresso using my Canon EOS 7D handheld with a 20mm lens; ISO 4000 f2.8 1/50th of a second. While not as critically sharp as the tripod mounted Lumix image, it has a nice feel to it. Also, for me it’s a fast and easy ‘safety’ shot, in case my more elaborate technique using the Lumix failed to work as hoped.
I exposed this view of the Lusitania/Sud Expresso using my Canon EOS 7D handheld with a 20mm lens; ISO 4000 f2.8 1/50th of a second. While not as critically sharp as the tripod mounted Lumix image, it has a nice feel to it. Also, for me it’s a fast and easy ‘safety’ shot, in case my more elaborate technique using the Lumix failed to work as hoped.

I was distracted during my efforts by the arrival of a Takargo Vossloh E4000 diesel (powered by an EMD 16-710 engine) hauling a container train.

As soon as the train hotel pulled away, I repositioned to photograph the diesel-hauled container train.

Takargo Vossloh E4000 diesel rumbles in the sodium vapor gloom of Entrocamento. Lumix LX3 photo.
Takargo Vossloh E4000 diesel rumbles in the sodium vapor gloom of Entrocamento. Lumix LX3 photo.

Tracking the Light posts new material every morning.

Please share Tracking the Light!

http://briansolomon.com/trackingthelight/

Enhanced by Zemanta

Tilting Train: Portugal’s Alfa Pendular Service.

Photographing a tilting train at speed in curves.

My first experience with the Italian Pendolino design was in Switzerland more than 14 years ago when I was researching for my book Bullet Trains—a survey of high-speed trains and railways (published by MBI in 2001).

Here’s an excerpt from my text:

The Pendolino’s tilt system provides a luxurious, smooth ride, on sinuous track. The effect of the tilting is subtle and scarcely noticeable as the train glides a long at speed. The Pendolino has proven a successful export item, and have been ordered by Finnish, Czech, and British railways. The appeal of the Pendolino, and other successful tilting designs, such as the Spanish TALGO and Swedish X2000  is the ability to increase running speeds without a massive investment in new infrastructure.

Since that time, several additional European countries have added Pendolino trains to their fleets. I’ve photographed them in a half dozen countries, most recently in early April this year, in Portugal where they are assigned to premier services between Porto, Lisbon and Faro.

A gate keeper signals a passing Pendolino as it races through the country station at Mato de Miranda, Portugal on April 3, 2014. Exposed with a Canon EOS 7D with 100mm lens.
A gate keeper signals a passing Pendolino as it races through the country station at Mato de Miranda, Portugal on April 3, 2014. Exposed with a Canon EOS 7D with 100mm lens.

Trailing view of a CP Pendolino passing Mato de Miranda, Portugal on April 3, 2014. Canon EOS 7D with 20mm lens.
Trailing view of a CP Pendolino passing Mato de Miranda, Portugal on April 3, 2014. Canon EOS 7D with 20mm lens.

 

Comboios de Portugal (Portugal’s national railway, known by initials ‘CP’) has ten train-sets which work as Alfa Pendular services.

A challenge when photographing Pendolino trains is catching them mid-tilt. I’ve found one  way to capture this is working from the outside of a curve using a long telephoto lens. This is most effective when the front of the train has tilted but the rear remains level with the track structure.

It helps to level the camera with an obvious line-side vertical object such as electrification masts, signals or buildings.

Another technique is to catch the train on the inside of a curve with a wider lens, but still leveling the camera with line-side vertical elements.

A CP Pendolino glides out of the fog near Coimbroes, Porto on the last lap of its run northward from Lisbon. Canon EOS 7D with 100mm lens.
A CP Pendolino glides out of the fog near Coimbroes, Porto on the last lap of its run northward from Lisbon. Canon EOS 7D with 100mm lens.

Tracking the Light posts new material every morning.

Please share Tracking the Light!

http://briansolomon.com/trackingthelight/

Tomorrow: Night Photography, Iberian Style.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Portuguese Country Station at Riachos T Novas Golega—Daily Post

April 2, 2014.

A visit to Portugal’s national railway, Comboios de Portugal (known by initials ‘CP’) proved rewarding and photographically productive.

After arriving at Lisbon airport, I visited the rural station at Riachos T Novas in Golega. This place is a gem. Classic manned station building with freight sidings and all the trappings of another era, but very few of the intrusions of modern construction (in other words, no wire fences, overbuilt footbridges, etc.)

 

Locals gather on the platform at Riachos T. Novas station. April 2. 2014. Exposed with a Lumix LX3.
Locals gather on the platform at Riachos T. Novas station. April 2. 2014. Exposed with a Lumix LX3.

A sand train was being loaded on the siding when I arrived. As the last car was filled, the crew made an air-test an pulled away—Not a minute wasted. Lumix LX3 photo.
A sand train was being loaded on the siding when I arrived. As the last car was filled, the crew made an air-test an pulled away—Not a minute wasted. Lumix LX3 photo.

The station is on the busy double-track electrified mainline between Lisbon and Entroncamento. This carries a variety of freight and passenger trains, including through trains to Porto, and Spanish border crossings. Trains passed every 10-15 minutes.

At one point the sky opened and rain fell hard for few minutes. When it passed, a double rainbow graced the sky for a few minutes. My images of a suburban train with the cosmic weather were exposed on Fujichrome and remain latent pending processing.

A classic clock keeps time at the station. Lumix LX3 photo.
A classic clock keeps time at the station. Lumix LX3 photo.

A local electric pauses to discharge passengers, its windows reflecting a dramatic sky. Canon EOS 7D photo.
A local electric pauses to discharge passengers, its windows reflecting a dramatic sky. Canon EOS 7D photo.

 

A camera club was snapping all angles at the station at Riachos T Novas, Golega. The passing CP container train was just one of their many subjects. Exposed with Canon EOS 7D with 200 mm.
A camera club was snapping all angles at the station at Riachos T Novas, Golega. The passing CP container train was just one of their many subjects. Exposed with Canon EOS 7D with 200 mm.

A potted plant displays the CP logo, which reminds me of the old Irish Rail logo, except in royal blue instead of orange. Canon EOS 7D with 100mm lens.
A potted plant displays the CP logo, which reminds me of the old Irish Rail logo, except in royal blue instead of orange. Canon EOS 7D with 100mm lens.

Storm clouds over the old freight house/goods store. Where was the camera club now? They'd jumped a train when it started to rain. Canon EOS 7D with 20mm lens.
Storm clouds over the old freight house/goods store. Where was the camera club now? They’d jumped a train when it started to rain. Canon EOS 7D with 20mm lens.

 

You need rain for a rainbow. This one held in the sky for several minutes. Lumix LX3 photo. (And yes, I caught a train under it, but that's on film!).
You need rain for a rainbow. This one held in the sky for several minutes. Lumix LX3 photo. (And yes, I caught a train under it, but that’s on film!).

Interestingly, when I first arrived, a local camera club had descended en masse and was snapping away at everything. Unfortunately for the club, they departed before the rain and thus missed the glorious evening light! This was pity for them. By contrast, I worked through the best light and made the most of it.

A double-headed empty coal train blitzes the station at Riachos T Novas, Golega bound for the port of Sines, south of Lisbon. Canon EOS 7D with 20mm lens.
A double-headed empty coal train blitzes the station at Riachos T Novas, Golega bound for the port of Sines, south of Lisbon. Canon EOS 7D with 20mm lens.

Evening light makes for a nice study of the class railway station. Canon EOS 7D photo.
Evening light makes for a nice study of the class railway station. Canon EOS 7D photo.

The village beyond the station was pretty sleepy. Lumix LX3 photo.
The village beyond the station was pretty sleepy. Lumix LX3 photo.

Another northward container train passes heading toward Entroncamento. Canon EOS 7D photo with 200mm lens.
Another northward container train passes heading toward Entroncamento. Canon EOS 7D photo with 200mm lens.

Stay tuned for my further exploration of Portuguese railways.

Tracking the Light posts new material every morning.

Please share Tracking the Light!

http://briansolomon.com/trackingthelight/

Enhanced by Zemanta