Tag Archives: Ireland

Rainbow with Dublin’s LUAS-3 Photos.

On 2 October 2017, I was walking the LUAS Red Line in Dublin. The sun was out but a dark cloud was fast approaching from the north.

I could I see the rain coming.

While watching the sky, I met fellow photographer Ciarán Cooney. He too was watching the lighting conditions unfold, but was heading for the tram.

He said to me, “I have bad luck with rainbows. I suppose I’ll see this on Tracking the Light!”

A minute later he boarded the LUAS tram that appears in these images.

Lumix LX7 photo, Dublin, Ireland.
A LUAS Red Line tram on Benburb Street in Dublin. Lumix LX7 photo.
Less tram, more rainbow.

Tracking the Light posts daily.

 

Incidental Photographs from the Munster Double.

Rail tours offer the opportunity to make incidental photos of the railway.

I made these digital photos of Irish Rail while traveling on last weekend’s Railway Preservation Society of Ireland’s Munster Double.

Sunrise with the DART as v viewed from RPSI’s Munster Double Railtour departing Connolly Station on the morning of 14 October 2017. Lumix LX7 photo.
Irish Rail Mark4 departs Kent Station in Cork on October 17, 2017. FujiFilm XT1 photo.
Kent Station, Cork. Lumix LX7 photo.
Irish Rail ICR departs Tralee on 14 October 2017. FujiFilm XT1 with 28-135mm lens.

Tracking the Light Posts new material daily.

LUAS Trial on Culture Night—22 September 2017.

It was the annual Dublin Culture Night Event when dozens of establishments open their doors and/or host special events free for the public.

I was making my rounds, and I happened upon a LUAS 4000-series tram making trials of the new Cross City trackage.

I believe in taking advantage of photographic opportunity when presented, and I made these views using my Lumix LX7.

LUAS trial on Parnell Street, Dublin. Regular service is still months away.
Trams on Marlborough and Abbey Streets. The distant tram is on a Cross City trackage trial. Lumix LX7 photo.

Tracking the Light Posts Daily!

Coming and Going: The Belfast-Dublin Enterprise on the old Great Northern Line near Mosney

There’s a lightly used road bridge over Irish Rail’s old Great Northern line south of the former station at Mosney that offers a clean view in both directions.

The Irish Sea is in the distance to the east.

A week ago David Hegarty and I spent a few hours here making photos of passing trains.

The Enterprise is a cross-border service connecting Belfast and Dublin. Trains are arranged in a push-pull configuration with the locomotive at the Belfast-end. Exposed at 1/1000th of a second to minimize motion blur.
Trailing view: Exposed at 1/1000th of a second to minimize motion blur.

I made these views using my FujiFilm XT1 fitted with a fixed focal length 27mm pancake lens, which offers an angle of view rough equivalent to a 41mm lens on a traditional 35mm film camera. In other words it is a slightly wide-angle perspective.

Tracking the Light Posts Every Day!

Up Close with Irish Rail 215 in Fresh Paint-Five New Photos.

Irish Rail’s class 201 General Motors-built diesel-electric number 215 (now technically 92 60 02 10215-6) was recently repainted in fresh green and silver paint.

Over the last few days I had several opportunities to photograph this locomotive up-close, allowing for some detailed images.

Here’s a selection of Lumix LX7 views.

Irish Rail 215 works the back of a Mark 4 set on approach to Heuston Station Dublin.
Irish Rail 215 at Dublin’s Heuston Station. Lumix LX7 digital photo.
Irish Rail 215 at Dublin’s Heuston Station. Lumix LX7 digital photo.
Irish Rail 215 at Kent Station, Cork. Lumix LX7 digital photo.
Irish Rail 215 at Kent Station, Cork. Lumix LX7 digital photo. Contrast and saturation adjusted in post processing.

Tracking the Light Posts Daily!

NI Railways on the Roll—Panned Views Crossing the Lagan.

A few weeks back on a trip to Belfast, I exposed these views of NI Railway’s CAF-built diesel railcars crossing the River Lagan.

To convey a sense of motion I panned the trains using a relatively slow shutter speed with a medium telephoto lens. By using an even panning motion I was able to keep the train sharp with the background is blurred.

Exposed at f 22 for 1/60th of a second. 135mm focal length.
Exposed at f20 for 1/60th of a second.

Tracking the Light Posts Every Day.

Belmond’s Grand Hibernian at Cabra.

A couple weeks ago, I met fellow photographer Jay Monaghan in Cabra to document the passing of Belmond’s luxury tour train that was making it’s scheduled move to Dublin’s Connolly Station.

Using my FujiFilm X-T1 digital camera, I opted for this portrait-oriented (vertical) telephoto view to accentuate the Dublin Mountains. In contrast to my view, Jay executed a very nice wide-angle photograph that better shows the cutting and the length of Belmond’s train.

Working with the camera-RAW file in post processing, I adjusted contrast and lightened shadow areas slightly to lessen the effects of midday-sun.

The Grand Hibernian uses 10 custom refurbished former Irish Rail Mark3 carriages, making it the longest regularly scheduled passenger train in Ireland.

In this instance an Irish Rail class 071 diesel is working the train, but for most moves Irish Rail 216 specially painted in Belmond navy-blue is assigned to it.

In season, Belmond’s high-end excursion train makes tours of Irish railways.

Tracking the Light Posts Daily

Irish Rail InterCity Railcars pass Islandbridge Junction.

It was a bright morning. I was out for the down IWT Liner (International Warehousing and Transport container train that runs almost daily from Dublin’s Northwall to Ballina, County Mayo).

While I was waiting this Irish Rail ICR (InterCity Railcar) came up road on it approach to Dublin’s Heuston Station.

Sometimes its nice to catch an ordinary train in great morning light.

Lumix LX-7 photo.

Tracking the Light Posts Daily.

Irish Rail DART crosses at level crossing in Bray.

A northward DART suburban train clears the crossing at Bray, County Wicklow. Lumix LX7 photo.

I exposed this view of a DART train at the level crossing near the station in Bray, County Wicklow, Ireland. Notice the Irish Sea in the background.

Tracking the Light is on AutoPilot while Brian is traveling.

 

Steam at Bray Head on Easter Monday.

Sometimes the railway photo isn’t about the train.

I made this pair of photos at Bray Head, County Wicklow, Ireland on Easter Monday 2017.

Railway Preservation Society engine No 4 was working trips from Dublin to Graystones, so I made the trek out along the head to capture these timeless views.

Although I made a few digital images, I prefer these black & white photos.

These were exposed on Ilford HP5 using a Leica IIIA and processed in Perceptol (1:1 for 14 minutes at 69 degrees F). No toning. Although, I think a dip in selenium would improve the contrast a bit.

Tracking the light posts every day.

A Forgotten Barrow Bridge—two views.

Irish Rail crosses the Barrow at Monasterevin, again near Bagenalstown, and finally with a large bridge between Waterford and Campile near Great Island.

Largely forgotten is the long closed bridge northeast of New Ross on the line that once went to the Junction at Macmine via Palace East in County Wexford. More than half a century has passed since the last scheduled train over this bridge.

I made these pastoral views from a road high above the Barrow looking in a westerly direction.

Tracking the Light is on autopilot while Brian is traveling.

 

 

Romantic Ruin—overgrown cutting near New Ross, County Wexford.

This old railway right of way once carried the line that connected New Ross and Palace East, County Wexford (Ireland), a section closed in 1963.

Exposed on Tri-X using a Leica IIIa with screw mount 35mm Nikkor lens.

Tracking the Light is on auto pilot while Brian is traveling. See http://briansolomon.com/trackingthelight

Are Two Trains Better Than One?

Last year Irish Rail cleared its cuttings on the northern approach to the Phoenix Park Tunnel in Dublin in preparation for introduction of a regular passenger service over the line to Grand Canal Docks.

This work had the secondary effect of improving a number of photo locations, such as this view from the Dublin’s Old Cabra Road.

Last week on advice from Colm O’Callaghan, I opted to work from this vantage point to photograph an Irish Rail empty ‘Spoil train’ [that carries debris left over from line works etc] that had been scheduled to run to the North Wall in Dublin.

Shortly before the focus of my effort came into view an empty Irish Rail passenger train arrived and was blocked at the signal outside the tunnel.

My question to you: are the photographs made more interesting by the presence of the passenger train?

Exposed using a FujiFilm X-T1 with 18-135mm lens set at 135mm.
A wider view from the same vantage point.

Tracking the Light Intends to Post Every Day, 365 days a year.

Narrow Gauge Monochrome—A Different Approach.

Five alternative views of Ireland’s Bord na Mona railway.

Here I’m trying something different: Working with an old Leica IIIa fitted with an ancient screw-mount Nikkor 35mm lens, I exposed some Fomapan 100 black & white film.

Instead of my normal process, I opted to soup the film in Ilford Perceptol. I mixed the stock solution from powder. Recommended development time was 8 minutes, but I cut this to 6 minutes, then after complete processing (stop, fix, hypo-clear and wash) I toned the negatives with a 1-9 Selenium solution to boost highlights (and then rewashed).

It was my first time working with Perceptol; overall I was pleased with the results, which yielded fine grain, broad tonality and a somewhat softer over-all image than what I’d been getting using ID-11.

This camera-lens-film-developer combination seems to have worked well with the rustic Bord na Mona narrow gauge industrial railway. I’ve opted to display a handful of the dozen or so monochrome images I exposed that day.

Tracking the Light takes a different approach today.

Irish Rail Heritage Locomotive Works the Sperry Train.

Service Notice: Brian will be traveling for the next few days. New Tracking the Light posts will go up daily, but email notices may be delayed. To see the most recent posts, please check: http://briansolomon.com/trackingthelight/

On Monday, 13 March 2017, I photographed Irish Rail 071 in heritage paint working the Sperry rail-defect detection train. (The Sperry equipment is in a yellow container at the middle of the train).

I’d planned these photographs at ‘the Gullet’ (west of Islandbridge Junction between Dublin Heuston and Inchicore) on the previous Friday, but the train was canceled. Patience and persistence paid off in the end. (There’s your tips for the day).

Irish Rail 071 works west  on the morning of 13 March 2017. Exposed digitally with a FujiFilm X-T1 fitted with 18-135mm lens. File adjusted for contrast using Lightroom.
Exposed using a Panasonic Lumix LX7.
Trailing view exposed with a FujiFilm X-T1.

Tracking the Light Posts Daily.

 

 

 

 

Sunny Day on the Bog.

Bord na Mona (Irish peat board) operates an extensive network of narrow gauge industrial railways in the Irish midlands.

It has been nearly two years since I last explored this fascinating diminutive railway in action.

It helps to have the sun to photograph Bord na Mona, as the bog can be outright dreary on a dull wet day.

The sun seemed to have emerged from the lingering blanket of dampness that lately has prevailed across Ireland, so Denis McCabe and I made a foray to Shannonbridge, County Offaly location of the busiest Bord na Mona railway operation.

A laden Bord na Mona train clatters across the bog on the way to Shannonbridge, Co. Offaly. Exposed digitally using my FujiFilm X-T1.
This side view offers an interesting perspective on the locomotive and laden peat wagons. Exposed digitally using my FujiFilm X-T1.

Bord na Mona trains come clattering along, often running in pairs or groups, but patience is often needed to find trains on the move.

Check out Tracking the Light’s archives for previous posts on the Bord na Mona.

Further Adventures with Irish Narrow Gauge.

 

Bord na Mona’s Ash Train

Tracking the Light Posts Daily.

Irish Rail Limerick Colbert Station Revisited

It was here at Colbert Station Limerick that I boarded my first Irish Rail train, a two piece push-pull led by a 121 Class General Motors diesel. That was just about 19 years ago (February 1998).

The other day, I decided to travel by train to Limerick. Unfortunately on the way out I discovered that my ‘connection’ at Limerick Junction was a bus. Poor show Irish Rail. (Can I blame them for the rain too?)

On the return, my train operated (hooray!). Waiting to board, I made a few photos of the old station, which uses of the traditional terminal head-house and iron train shed arrangement.

Out front it has been cleaned up a bit, but for the most part the station looks much the way it did on my first visit all those years ago. No 121 though.

New paving stones, benches and decorative trees have improved the approach to Irish Rail’s Limerick Station. Note the big sign advertising trains.
Colbert station uses a traditional arrangement with concourse and train shed.

All photos were exposed using my Lumix LX7 in February 2017.

The outward Limerick-Limerick Junction train consisted of a 3-piece Intercity Railcar. This was very well patronized.
Trains operate from Limerick to several destinations, including Dublin and Galway.

Looking toward Colbert Station from a nearby road bridge.

 

Tracking the Light is Daily.

Tomorrow: how I photographed a train by accident.

Winter Light on an old Midland & Great Western Railway Station

I exposed these photos of Irish Rail’s former Midland & Great Western Railway station at Ballinsloe in January 2000. At the time, Fujichrome Sensia II (100 ISO) was my standard colour slide film.

Crisp winter sun made for excellent lighting to feature this stone building.

Tracking the Light Posts Daily

Lumix Views: Railway Preservation Society of Ireland’s The Western Explorer—Part 3.

Not one, not two but three cameras served as my visual capturing arsenal last Saturday.

I had so many files to download that it’s taken me a few days to finally get this selection ready for review.

Is more better?

As with my FujiFilm X-T1 photos, with my Lumix I was interested in capturing some of personalities on Railway Preservation Society of Ireland’s The Western Explorer.

Getting the right angle at Connolly Station before the trip. Saturday 22 October 2016.
Getting the right angle at Connolly Station before the trip. Saturday 22 October 2016.
Saturday 22 October 2016.
Saturday 22 October 2016.
Documenting the down run.
Documenting the down run.
Washboard sky at Monasterevin. Saturday 22 October 2016.
Washboard sky at Monasterevin. Saturday 22 October 2016.
Saturday 22 October 2016.
Saturday 22 October 2016.
Gort. Saturday 22 October 2016.
Gort. Saturday 22 October 2016.
Gort. Saturday 22 October 2016.
Gort. Saturday 22 October 2016.
Ennis, County Clare. Saturday 22 October 2016.
Ennis, County Clare. Saturday 22 October 2016.
Ennis, County Clare. Saturday 22 October 2016.
Ennis, County Clare. Saturday 22 October 2016.
Irish Rail station building at Ennis. Saturday 22 October 2016.
Irish Rail station building at Ennis. Saturday 22 October 2016.
Limerick. Saturday 22 October 2016.
Limerick. Saturday 22 October 2016.
Limerick. Saturday 22 October 2016.
Limerick. Saturday 22 October 2016.
Limerick. Saturday 22 October 2016.
Limerick. Saturday 22 October 2016.
Limerick. Saturday 22 October 2016.
Limerick. Saturday 22 October 2016.
Limerick. Saturday 22 October 2016.
Limerick. Saturday 22 October 2016.
Limerick. Saturday 22 October 2016.
Limerick. Saturday 22 October 2016.

lar_p1540741

Back at Connolly!
Back at Connolly!

gerry_and_hassard_p1540750

Tracking the Light posts daily!

Railway Preservation Society of Ireland’s The Western Explorer—Part 2.

 

Yesterday, I presented scaled camera JPGs of Railway Preservation Society of Ireland’s The Western Explorer, which operated from Dublin’s Connolly Station on 22 October 2016.

Today’s selection, are photos made using my FujiFilm X-T1 digital camera, but using the Camera RAW files and manipulating the data in Lightroom to present a more pleasing image.

Using contrast controls, I’ve maximized detail in highlights and shadows while adjusting colour saturation and exposure to produce more refined final images.

The day of trip featured fine weather and fluffy/lacey clouds decorated a largely blue sky. To bring in sky detail, it was necessary to locally adjust exposure and contrast using a digitally applied graduated filter.

In other instances, I manually lightened shadow areas, that without such adjustment would appear too dark and lacking in necessary detail.

I was especially impressed with the sky at Tullamore, Co. Offaly. Although I had my graduated neutral density filter kit in my camera bag, the hasty nature of photo stops was conducive to using it. Instead, I've had to make due with digital adjustment in post processing.
I was especially impressed with the sky at Tullamore, Co. Offaly. Although I had my graduated neutral density filter kit in my camera bag, the hasty nature of photo stops was not conducive to using it. Instead, I’ve had to make due with digital adjustment in post processing.
Athlone.
Athlone.
A little contrast control goes a long way. By lowering the highlights and brightening the shadow areas, I was able to make for a much more pleasing image.
A little contrast control goes a long way. By lowering the highlights and brightening the shadow areas, I was able to make for a much more pleasing image.

 

Wide angle view of RPSI's the Western Explorer at Athenry, County Galway.
Wide angle view of RPSI’s the Western Explorer at Athenry, County Galway.
Gort features a modern footbridge that uses thick sheet-metal meshes. The effect of the holes in the mesh distorts the light resulting in some peculiar patterns. The patterns are not the result of digital image processing.
Gort station features a modern footbridge that uses thick sheet-metal meshes. The effect of the holes in the mesh distorts the light resulting in some peculiar patterns. The patterns are not the result of digital image processing.
Another view at Gort.
Another view at Gort station.
Photographers were looking for angles at Ennis, County Clare. The station shadow made for a challenging used of light.
Photographers were looking for angles at Ennis, County Clare. The station shadow made for a challenging used of light.
At Dromkeen, the special crossed an ICR on its way to Limerick.
At Dromkeen, the special crossed an ICR on its way to Limerick.
I made a series of views from the train windows. This one was exposed using my FujiFilm X-T1 with Zeiss 12mm Touit lens.
I made a series of views from the train windows. This one was exposed using my FujiFilm X-T1 with Zeiss 12mm Touit lens.
mark_watching_scenery_dscf8248
A view with the Zeiss 12mm Touit lens

Tracking the Light Posts Daily.

RPSI’s The Western Explorer, 22 October 2016—Part 1 with Dozens of JPGs.

Yesterday (22 October 2016) the Railway Preservation Society of Ireland in cooperation with Irish Rail operated a diesel-hauled excursion making a circle trip from Dublin’s Connolly Station.

Among the goals for the tour was a fundraising effort to help restore RPSI’s 1960-era class 121/141 General Motors diesels to traffic.

To emphasize the roll of heritage diesels,  Irish Rail locomotive 071 (class leader) wearing the retro 1970s ‘Super Train’ livery worked from Dublin to Limerick, with engine 084 (in modern gray and yellow) bringing the train back up to Dublin.

My interest was in capturing the spirit of the day. In addition to photographs of the equipment, I focused on people; Irish Rail employees, RPSI volunteers and organizers, and passengers.

My cameras were busy all day. I made more than 500 digital images; so I’ll be editing my files for some hours yet.

This first round of photographs is a selection of camera-JPGs from my FujiFilm X-T1 digital camera. Since the JPGs don’t require much work (except for scaling) these are easier to put up quickly. Later I’ll present a selection of images made from Camera RAW files, and finally a few views with my Lumix LX7.

As is often the case, I also exposed some 35mm slides, but those remain latent for the moment.

071 at Gort.
071 at Gort.
Irish Rail 071 detailed view FujiFilm X-T1 digital photo using the Velvia colour profile.
Irish Rail 071 detailed view FujiFilm X-T1 digital photo using the Velvia colour profile.
Fields of enthusiasts at Athenry.
Fields of enthusiasts at Athenry.

dylan_at_the_bar_dscf8100

finbar_and_tommy_dscf8250

billy_at_attymon_dscf8098

joe_mckeown_dscf8208

jay_and_paul_on_the_train_dscf8123

Attymon, County Galway. Telephoto view from the road bridge.
Attymon, County Galway. Telephoto view from the road bridge.
Athenry, County Galway.
Athenry, County Galway.
Tullamore. Gosh, where's the old cement train?
Tullamore. Gosh, where’s the old cement train gone?
In the spirit of the day.
In the spirit of the day.
Ennis, County Clare.
Ennis, County Clare.
Detailed view of Irish Rail class 071, a 1976 built General Motors six-motor diesel.
Detailed view of Irish Rail class 071, a 1976 built General Motors six-motor diesel.
Discussing logistics.
Discussing logistics.
Noel Enright poses with 071 at Athlone.
Noel Enright poses with 071 at Athlone.

peter_emmet_dscf8156

kevin_walker_dscf8063

mark_t_whistle_dscf8078peter_denis_noel_at_athlone_dscf8051

rpsi_staff_at_gort_dscf8163

tina_silo_dscf8190

Checking the football scores.
Checking the football scores.
Getting the shot.
Getting the shot.
Running for the train at Thurles.
Running for the train at Thurles.
Happy Birthday Tina!
Happy Birthday Tina!

tina_w_cake_dscf8260

Old 084 at Limerick.
Old 084 at Limerick.

noel_at_ennis_dscf8174

Tracking the Light Posts Daily

On Irish Rail’s 0830 train to Tralee (Change at Mallow)—2 October 2016.

I’m traveling to Cork on Irish Rail’s 0830 Dublin-Heuston to Tralee scheduled train.

Tomorrow (Monday October 3, 2016.), I’ll be presenting a variation of my slide program Irish Railways Looking Back Ten Years to the Cork Branch of the Irish Railway Record Society in the Metropole Hotel in Cork City at 8pm.

Here are a few views exposed with my Lumix LX7 at Heuston Station and on the train-posted LIVE from the train thanks to Irish Rail’s WiFi.

Sunrise at Heuston Station exposed with my Lumix LX7. Where's John Gruber's nun?
Sunrise at Heuston Station exposed with my Lumix LX7. Where’s John Gruber’s nun?

icr_to_tralee_at_heuston_station_p1520647

Exposed with my Lumxi LX7.
Exposed  at Heuston Station with my Lumix LX7.
Exposed with my Lumix LX7 from the train at Heuston Station.
Exposed with my Lumix LX7 from the train at Heuston Station.
icr_heuston_station_p1520653
Irish Rail ICR at Heuston Station on Sunday morning.
p1520662
Crossing the Curragh in the fog, Lumix LX7 Photo.
The Medium is the Message—My laptop on the train as I'm producing this post-the file was downloaded directly from the card to WordPress.
The Medium is the Message—My laptop on the train as I’m producing this post-the file was downloaded directly from the card to WordPress.
There's my Lumix next to the Apple. Exposed with my FujiFilm XT1 passing Templemore.
There’s my Lumix next to the Apple. Exposed with my FujiFilm XT1 passing Templemore.
10:30am: Reflections at Limerick Junction. Lumix LX7 Photo.
10:30am: Reflections at Limerick Junction  That’s the Limerick-Limerick Junction shuttle that’s parked on the adjacent platform ‘out of service’.. Lumix LX7 Photo.
View near Killmallock, County Limerick. Lumix LX7 photo.
View near Killmallock, County Limerick. Lumix LX7 photo.

By the way, just in case anyone is curious; Irish Rail 071 in the retro ‘super train livery’ is at the yard in Portlaoise with a spoil train.

Tracking the Light is Daily!

Tracking the light will be on ‘Autopilot’ for the next couple of days, but will continue to display new material every morning.

Emerald Isle Express near Killiney—26 September 2016.

The Emerald Isle Express is an annual tour train operated Rail Tours Ireland in cooperation with Irish Rail and the Railway Preservation Society Ireland.

I had advanced notice of this year’s schedule and planned to catch it running along the Irish Sea south of Dublin on its way down the old Dublin & South Eastern route toward Rosslare Europort.

I rode the DART electric suburban train to Dalkey then hoofed it out toward Sorrento Point, where my planned location turned out to be fouled by undergrowth and related shadows.

‘Uh oh.’ Time to move to plan B.

More walking brought me to this footbridge between Dalkey and Killiney.

Although supremely picturesque, the maze of direct current overhead wires and related masts make finding a suitable angle difficult.

I wanted to include more of the Irish Sea to the right of the train, but putting the train too far to the left didn’t really work as an effective composition. Ultimately I settled on a more conservative angle. Soft sun helps reduce the distraction of the wires.

Emerald Isle Express at milepost 9. To hold detail in the sky and water, I used a Lee 0.6 graduated neutral density filter. This tool has proved repeatedly valuable in Ireland where sky contrast often presents an exposure problem by exceeding the dynamic range of the camera’s digital sensor.
Emerald Isle Express at milepost 9. To hold detail in the sky and water, I used a Lee 0.6 graduated neutral density filter. This tool has proved repeatedly valuable in Ireland where sky contrast often presents an exposure problem by exceeding the dynamic range of the camera’s digital sensor.
This tight view reveals some of the clutter that makes this location challenging as an effective location.
This tight view reveals some of the clutter that makes this location challenging as an effective location.

A minor disappointment; I’d hoped that Irish Rail engine number 071 (in bright orange heritage paint) would lead the train. Instead, I settled for that old stalwart; Irish Rail engine 078.

The trailing view is scenically spectacular but as a result the train is small.
The trailing view is scenically spectacular but as a result the train is small.
Looking across Killiney Bay you'll notice the thin silver streak of the Emerald Isle Express catching the glint of the noontime sun.
Looking across Killiney Bay you’ll notice the thin silver streak of the Emerald Isle Express catching the glint of the noontime sun.

Tracking the Light posts every day!

 

Railway Portraits—don’t ignore the human side of railways.

Too often railway photographs focus on the equipment—locomotives, railway cars, signals—and exclude the people who work on the railway.

I’ll admit I’m guilty of that sometimes. However, I’ve always made photos of railway workers, and try to include people in my photos whenever it’s practical.

That’s not always easy, especially on many modern railways that have streamlined their workforces.

These days I’ll work my personal connections and photograph railway friends when it’s appropriate.

Cork-based Irish Rail train driver Ken Fox poses for a portrait with his InterCity Railcar at Dublin's Heuston Station. Exposed on Ilford HP5 using a Nikon F3 with Nikkor f1.8 50mm lens. Processed in Kodak HC110 (dilution D) and scanned with an Epson V500 flatbed scanner.
Cork-based Irish Rail train driver Ken Fox poses for a portrait with his InterCity Railcar at Dublin’s Heuston Station. Exposed on Ilford HP5 using a Nikon F3 with Nikkor f1.8 50mm lens. Processed in Kodak HC110 (dilution D) and scanned with an Epson V500 flatbed scanner.

I like this portrait because it puts the train driver in a positive light while his train takes a supporting roll, serving as a relevant backdrop rather than primary subject.

Tracking the Light is Daily.

 

Rolling Meet at Mosney.

There’s a certain thrill to having two trains approach simultaneously.

Saturday, Denis McCabe, David Hegarty and myself had selected a bridge near Mosney (mp25) on the old Great Northern Railway Dublin-Belfast line as a good place to catch Belmond’s Grand Hibernian cruise train.

The Belmond train departed Dublin Connolly behind an Irish Rail local passenger train and its progress was slowed when it encountered restrictive signals.

Another Irish Rail local was scheduled in the Dublin direction.

As it happened the two trains passed below us.

Belmont's Grand Hibernian rolls northward at milepost 25. The lighting was tricky. Diffused backlit sun made for a complicated exposure calculation. I used a Lee .6 graduated neutral density filter to hold detail in the sky. In post processing I lightened shadow detail slightly while controlling highlights to reduce glare on the top of the locomotive.
Belmont’s Grand Hibernian rolls northward at milepost 25. The lighting was tricky. Diffused backlit sun made for a complicated exposure calculation. I used a Lee .6 graduated neutral density filter to hold detail in the sky. In post processing I lightened shadow detail slightly while controlling highlights to reduce glare on the top of the locomotive.
I turned quickly to make this grab shot of the Grand Hibernian meeting an Irish Rail 29000-series diesel railcar on the opposite main track. In retrospect, I think I'd could have made a more dramatic image if I'd used a telephoto lens setting.
I turned quickly to make this grab shot of the Grand Hibernian meeting an Irish Rail 29000-series diesel railcar on the opposite main track. In retrospect, I think I’d could have made a more dramatic image if I’d used a telephoto lens setting.
I moved over a few feet to get a better angle of the approaching railcar. The gray roofs on Belmond's Mark3 carriages isn't especially photogenic.
I moved over a few feet to get a better angle of the approaching railcar. The gray roofs on Belmond’s Mark3 carriages isn’t especially photogenic.

I exposed this sequence using my FujiFilm X-T1.

Tracking the Light posts often.

Dublin Airport: Colourful Contemporary Jets with a September sky—Lots of Photos!

A sunny September Saturday afternoon in Dublin; what better time to make a visit to the airport. Not to travel to distant cities, but simply to watch and photograph the parade of commercial aircraft.

Lots of different airlines make for a colourful parade of planes.

I used this as an opportunity to test my FujiFilm X-T1’s various auto-focus settings.

The ‘C’ (continuous) setting seemed to produce the sharpest results, but introduced a slight delay from time I pressed the shutter-button until the actual moment of exposure. I found the delay difficult, but so long as I could anticipate the delay I was able to work around it.

Another challenge was trying to keep the camera level while panning the rapidly moving planes.

aer_lingus_a330_dscf4433lufthansa_at_dublin_dscf4403ryan_air_under_and_over_dscf4425smartwings_at_dublin_dscf4347transavia_at_dublin_dscf4312fed_ex_plane_at_dublin_airport_dscf4279aer_lingus_heritage_livery_dscf4276turkish_airlines_landing_at_dublin_dscf4272aer_lingus_rugby_plane_dscf4261luxair_at_dublin_airport_dscf4189air_transat_dublin_airport_dscf4163air_france_cargo_777_dscf4148american_airlines_dscf4131fly_be_dublin_airport_dscf4126city_jet_dublin_airport_dscf4071dublin_airport_bus_dscf4068british_airways_dublin_airport_dscf4060alba_star_dublin_airport_dscf4047

Tracking the Light Posts Daily.

 

 

Irish Rail 080 works Grand Hibernian at Islandbridge Junction—5 September 2016.

 

Click on Tracking the Light to view the uncropped photos.

I watched as a band of high cloud inched across the morning sky.

Irish Rail class 071 diesel number 080 brought Belmond’s Grand Hibernian Mark 3 consist through the wash at Heuston Station. Interesting light with an unusual train.

To hold detail in the textured sky, I used a Lee 0.6 graduated neutral density filter with the darker portion of the filter positioned at the top of the frame.

FujiFilm XT1 with 18-135mm lens and Lee 0.6 graduated neutral density filter. Minor post-processing contrast and saturation adjustment was made using Lightroom.
FujiFilm XT1 with 18-135mm lens and Lee 0.6 graduated neutral density filter. Minor post-processing contrast and saturation adjustment was made using Lightroom.
FujiFilm XT1 with 18-135mm lens and Lee 0.6 graduated neutral density filter. Minor post-processing contrast and saturation adjustment was made using Lightroom.
FujiFilm XT1 with 18-135mm lens and Lee 0.6 graduated neutral density filter. Minor post-processing contrast and saturation adjustment was made using Lightroom.

Tracking the Light posts Every Day.

 

 

Bord na Mona freight three years ago this day!

A pair of Bord na Mona loaded trains work west toward Lanesborough, County Longford on August 9, 2013.
A pair of Bord na Mona loaded trains work west toward Lanesborough, County Longford on August 9, 2013.

I made this image on Ireland’s three-foot gauge Bord na Mona (Peat Bord) near Lanesborough on this day three years ago.

To compress the space and make the most of the two trains following one another in close succession, I used my Canon 7D fitted with a 200m telephoto lens.

Tracking the Light is on Autopilot while Brian is Traveling!

Irish Rail’s Connolly Station—April 1998.

I exposed this view at Dublin Connolly Station in April 1998 using a Nikon F2 fitted with a Nikkor f2.8 135mm lens and loaded with Ilford HP5 black & white negative film.

Ilford HP5 is a 400 ISO emulsion. I processed this roll in Kodak D76 1:1 with water. Today, I still occasionally use HP5, but now I'd opt to process it in HC110, which I find gives it a broader tonality and softer grain.
Ilford HP5 is a 400 ISO emulsion. I processed this roll in Kodak D76 1:1 with water. Today, I still occasionally use HP5, but now I’d opt to process it in HC110, which I find gives it a broader tonality and softer grain. This image was scanned from the original 35mm negative using an Epson V600 flatbed scanner and then adjusted using Lightroom.

The day was a characteristically bright overcast, a typically Irish day with lighting well suited to Ilford black & white.

Tracking the Light posts every day; sometimes twice!

Exploring Historic Railways of Cork-Two Dozen Unique Images.

Cork’s railways were once vastly more complex than they are today.

Over a three-day span beginning 7 May 2016, I was given a thorough tour of Cork’s historic railways that included: a walking tour of the route of the old Cork City Railway; a cycle tour of the route of the Cork, Blackrock & Passage; and a detailed look at the numerous railway terminals that once served this southwestern Irish city.

I made numerous photographs composed to document railway settings as they are today. In many instances service was discontinued decades ago and the lines lifted and so the role of the railway is more conceptual than literal.

Thanks to Ken Fox, Donncha Cronin, Brian Sherman, Kevin Meany and Richard Lee for their expert guidance and historical knowledge.

I arrived by Irish Rail's Mark4 from Dublin. This view of Cork's Kent Station (Glanmire Road) was made from the foot bridge over the right of way of the line to the old Summer Hill Station.
I arrived by Irish Rail’s Mark4 from Dublin. This view of Cork’s Kent Station (Glanmire Road) was made from the foot bridge over the right of way of the line to the old Summer Hill Station. I featured Kent Station in my book Railway Depots, Stations and Terminals.
I've always liked Kent Station's Victorian-era curved train shed. Exposed with a FujiFilm X-T1 digital camera.
I’ve always liked Kent Station’s Victorian-era curved train shed. Exposed with a FujiFilm X-T1 digital camera.
Irish Rail 201-class diesel 220 at Kent Station Cork on 7 May 2016. Lumix LX7 photo.
Irish Rail 201-class diesel 220 at Kent Station Cork on 7 May 2016. Lumix LX7 photo.
Old footpath over the line to Summer Hill Station.
Old footpath over the line to Summer Hill Station. Kent Station is 180 degrees behind this view.
Site of Summer Hill station that once handled trains working the line toward Cobh.
Site of Summer Hill station that once handled trains working the line toward Cobh.
Detail of the iron work on the foot bridge near Summer Hill station.
Detail of the iron work on the foot bridge near Summer Hill station.
Kent Station viewed from the Glanmire Road bridge. The earlier Penrose Quay station was located to the right of the curved shed.
Kent Station viewed from the Glanmire Road bridge. The earlier Penrose Quay station was located to the right of the curved shed.
Donncha Cronin hold a vintage photo of the Capwell Station at the old station building (now used by a Bus Eíreann maintenance depot).
Donncha Cronin holds a vintage photo of the Capwell Station at the old station building (now used by a Bus Eíreann maintenance depot). Historically, Capwell was the terminus for the Cork & Macroom Railway.
Panoramic composite of the old Capwell Station.
Panoramic composite of the old Capwell Station (centre).
Old railway gate at the site of Cork, Blackrock & Passage's Albert Road Station. Lumix LX7 photo.
Old railway gate at the site of Cork, Blackrock & Passage’s Albert Road Station. Lumix LX7 photo.
Cork, Blackrock & Passage Railway's Albert Road Station.
Cork, Blackrock & Passage Railway’s Albert Road Station.
The former offices for the Cork, Bandon & South Coast Railway near Albert Quay in Cork City.
The former offices for the Cork, Bandon & South Coast Railway near Albert Quay in Cork City.
Quayside trackage on the Cork City quay.
Quayside trackage on the Cork City quay.
Right of way of the old Cork City Railway.
Right of way of the old Cork City Railway.
Right of way of the old Cork City Railway.
Right of way of the old Cork City Railway.
Perhaps the last vestige of track relating to the Cork City Railway located near Albert Road in Cork.
Perhaps one of the last vestiges of track relating to the Cork City Railway located near Albert Road in Cork.
Perhaps the last vestige of track relating to the Cork City Railway located near Albert Road in Cork.
Perhaps one of  the last vestiges of track relating to the Cork City Railway located near Albert Road in Cork.
The old train staff that had been used to authorize train movements on the Cork City Railway. Photo courtesy of Kevin Meany.
The old train staff that had been used to authorize train movements on the Cork City Railway. Photo courtesy of Kevin Meany.
Site of the old Western Road station (now a hotel).
Site of the old Western Road station (now a hotel).
Cork, Blackrock & Passage was originally a broad gauge line, later converted to a largely double track 3 foot gauge suburban railway (similar in concept to the Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn). Now a popular urban cycle path.
Cork, Blackrock & Passage was originally a broad gauge line, later converted to a largely double track 3 foot gauge suburban railway (similar in concept to the Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn). Now a popular urban cycle path, seen here at Blackrock.
Site of Blackrock Station on the Cork, Blackrock & Passage Railway.
Site of Blackrock Station on the Cork, Blackrock & Passage Railway.
Near Monkstown Station on the Cork, Blackrock & Passage Railway.
Near Monkstown Station on the Cork, Blackrock & Passage Railway right of way.
Near Monkstown Station on the Cork, Blackrock & Passage Railway right of way.
Near Monkstown Station on the Cork, Blackrock & Passage Railway right of way.
Ken Fox studies a sign illustrating the history of the Cork, Blackrock & Passage.
Ken Fox studies a sign illustrating the history of the Cork, Blackrock & Passage at Carrigaline, Co. Cork.
A sign illustrating the history of the Cork, Blackrock & Passage at Carrigaline, Co. Cork.
A sign illustrating the history of the Cork, Blackrock & Passage at Carrigaline, Co. Cork.
Site of the Crosshaven terminus of the Cork, Blackrock & Passage suburban narrow gauge.
Site of the Crosshaven terminus of the Cork, Blackrock & Passage suburban narrow gauge.
Irish Rail's footbridge at Glounthaune Station. Lumix LX7 photo.
Irish Rail’s footbridge at Glounthaune Station. Lumix LX7 photo.
Glounthaune Station.
Glounthaune Station.
An Irish Rail 2600 passes the old container terminal at North Esk, last served by Irish Rail in summer 2005.
An Irish Rail 2600-series railcar passes the old container terminal at North Esk, last served by Irish Rail in summer 2005.

Tracking the Light posts Daily.

 

Views from the Train: Irish Scenery; trains, tracks, cows and snow . . . no wait, What?

Below are a selection of views I made from last weekend’s Irish Railway Record Society 071 Anniversary tour.

In earlier posts, I’ve covered other elements of this excellent railway trip across Ireland on 9-10 April 2016.

All photos were exposed digitally from the train’s windows.

Enjoy!

Irish Rail's Inchicore works as photographed on Saturday morning. This view offers a great cross section of active and stored General Motors diesel locomotives. Note the old 201s still in orange paint. Will they every run again? FujiFilm X-T1 photo.
Irish Rail’s Inchicore works as photographed on Saturday morning. This view offers a great cross section of active and stored General Motors diesel locomotives. Note the old 201s still in orange paint. Will they every run again? FujiFilm X-T1 photo.
Cows in rural Co. Tipperary as view along the Nenagh Branch on Saturday.
Cows in rural Co. Tipperary as view along the Nenagh Branch on Saturday.
Approach Cloughjordan on the Nenagh Branch.
Approaching Cloughjordan on the Nenagh Branch.
Stormy weather viewed from the Nenagh Branch.
Stormy weather viewed from the Nenagh Branch.
Fixed semaphore near Birdhill, on the Nenagh Branch.
Fixed semaphore near Birdhill, on the Nenagh Branch.
Irish Rail's Limerick shed.
Irish Rail’s Limerick shed.

Irish_rail_076_Limerick_Shed_DSCF3584

Irish Rail 076 at Limerick. This engine will take our train to Cork and Kerry.
Irish Rail 076 at Limerick. This engine will take our train to Cork and Kerry.
Sunset near Killarney dropping down the Bower.
Sunset near Killarney dropping down the Bower.
Killarney County Kerry.
Killarney, County Kerry.
On the Sunday morning run from Tralee to Killarney, approaching Farranfore. It was cold and beginning to snow.
On the Sunday morning run from Tralee to Killarney, approaching Farranfore. It was cold and beginning to snow.
Climbing the Bower out of Killarney. There was some snow to be seen. And this was April. For real.
Climbing the Bower out of Killarney. There was some snow to be seen. And this was April. For real.

Kerry_Snow_near_Killarney_P1430608

Limerick Junction cross the Cork line at grade. There's a Dublin to Cork Mark4 set heading down road.
Limerick Junction cross the Cork line at grade. Note the  Dublin to Cork Mark4 set heading down road.
Approaching Tipperary town, one of the few places were semaphores survive.
Approaching Tipperary town, one of the few places where semaphores survive.
View near Clonmel, County Tipperary.
View near Clonmel, County Tipperary.
Waterford West on the way toward Kilkenny. Semaphores remain here too! Long may they last.
Waterford West on the way toward Kilkenny. Semaphores remain here too! Long may they last.
Old 2700 railcars stored at Inchicore. Old. Hmm, I seem to recall these cars being delivered 'new'. Hmm.
Old 2700 railcars stored at Inchicore. Old. Hmm, I seem to recall these cars being delivered ‘new’. Hmm.
One of kind livery; Irish Rail 216 in a green primer at Inchicore as seen from the train.
One of kind livery; Irish Rail 216 in a green primer at Inchicore (as seen from the train).
Irish Rail 227 in the new Enterprise at Connolly shed.
Irish Rail 227 in the new Enterprise livery at Connolly shed.

Tracking the Light posts new photos daily.

Portraits: Irish Railway Record Society’s ‘071 class two-day 40th anniversary railtour’

The trains are the excuse to travel, but for me many of the most interesting photos are the portraits.

In the end, it’s the cast of characters that make the trip worthwhile.

Here are just a few from the dozens of images I exposed on Saturday and Sunday 9-10 April 2016.

IRRS tour organizer Shane Roberts at Connolly on the morning of the tour.
IRRS tour organizer Shane Roberts at Connolly on the morning of the tour.
Platform self portraits at Connolly.
Platform self portraits at Connolly.
Fixing a tail lamp.
Fixing a tail lamp.
Green flag to proceed at Connolly.
Green flag to proceed at Connolly.
Discussing logistics in the crew van.
Discussing logistics in the crew van.
On the platform at Kildare.
On the platform at Kildare.
RPSI's bar staff.
RPSI’s bar staff.
At Ballybrophy.
At Ballybrophy.
Ed came all the way from America for this trip.
Ed came all the way from America for this trip.
Sometimes the routine makes for an interesting photograph. Seen at Limerick.
Sometimes the routine makes for an interesting photograph. Seen at Limerick.
Cup of tea in the van.
Cup of tea in the van.
Irish Rail staff are key to operations.
Irish Rail staff are key to operations.
Driver Ken Fox at Charleville.
Driver Ken Fox at Charleville.
Catching up on the platform at Mallow.
Catching up on the platform at Mallow.
Inspection of the equipment.
Inspection of the equipment.
Crossing the viaduct at Mallow.
Crossing the viaduct at Mallow.

S_King_P1430366

John_and_Gerry_P1430371

Noel_and_Jim_P1430373

076_at_Cork_w_guy_in_RR_hat_P1430380

Mr_Grumpy_P1430443

Cast of characters at Rathmore.
Cast of characters at Rathmore.
Going for spin in the snow, like.
Going for spin in the snow, like.
Buffet car staff.
Buffet car staff.

Shane_Tommy_and_Noel_P1430616

Photographers at Rath.more
Photographers at Rathmore.
Photographers vying for position at Waterford.
Photographers vying for position at Waterford.
Reviewing results.
Reviewing results.
Product placement; Noel Enright holds my new book Railway Depots, Stations and Terminals.
Product placement; Noel Enright holds my new book Railway Depots, Stations and Terminals.
Watching the passing greenery.
Watching the passing greenery.
People wave at the train.
People wave at the train.

All of the above were made with my Lumix LX7.

More photos to come soon.

Tracking the Light posts everyday.

Irish Destinations: Stations visited during Irish Railway Record Society’s 071 Tour—20 New Photos.

Irish Railway Record Society’s ‘071 class two-day 40th anniversary railtour‘ covered a lot of ground in just two days.

The trip represented a mastery of coordination; special to thanks to everyone at Irish Railway Record Society, Railway Preservation Society of Ireland, and Irish Rail!

This a selection of 20 new images I made with my Lumix LX7. (I’m still down-loading the photos made with my FujiFilm X-T1).

The train was comprised of Railway Preservation Society of Ireland's Cravens, seen here at Dublin's Connolly Station. Lumix LX7 photo.
The train was comprised of Railway Preservation Society of Ireland’s Cravens, seen here at Dublin’s Connolly Station. Lumix LX7 photo.

We started and finished at Dublin’s Connolly Station, running to Ballybrophy (with train continuing ‘empty carriages’ to Lisduff sidings to change direction, then via the Nenagh Branch to Limerick.

Limerick to Cork, Cork back to Mallow, then to Killarney for an overnight stay. In the morning to Tralee (my visit there since I bought a digital camera!) then back to Kilarney.

Back via Mallow to Limerick Junction, then down my favorite line to Waterford via Carrick-on-Suir. From Waterford to Killkenny and via Cherryville Junction back up to Dublin.

There were lots of intermediate photographic stops along the way.

Engine 083 brought us from Dublin to Limerick via Nenagh. Viewed in a rare moment of sun at Connolly Station in Dublin.
Engine 083 brought us from Dublin to Limerick via Nenagh. Viewed in a rare moment of sun at Connolly Station in Dublin.

Irish_Rail_083_RPSI_train_Connolly_P1430188

In the bay at Ballybrophy.
In the bay at Ballybrophy.
Change of locos at Limerick; here 076 took over.
Change of locos at Limerick; here 076 took over.
083 at Limerick under the train shed.
083 at Limerick under the train shed.

Kent_Station_sign_P1430392

Ken Fox at the throttle after arriving in Cork.
Ken Fox at the throttle after arriving in Cork.

 

Kent Station in Cork features an unusual curved train shed, which I've featured in my recent book Railway Depots, Stations and Terminals (published by Voyageur Press).
Kent Station in Cork features an unusual curved train shed, which I’ve featured in my recent book Railway Depots, Stations and Terminals (published by Voyageur Press).
Amoung our numerous photo stops included a brief visit to Rathmore on the line from Mallow to Killarney.
Amoung our numerous photo stops included a brief visit to Rathmore on the line from Mallow to Killarney.
A wink of sun on arrival in Killarney. It wasn't so nice the following morning.
A wink of sun on arrival in Killarney. It wasn’t so nice the following morning.
Killarney town is a popular tourist destination. I made this view on a wander after checking in to the hotel.
Killarney town is a popular tourist destination. I made this view on a wander after checking in to the hotel.
Sunday morning in Killarney was cold and dark; but atmospheric. I made some of my most memorable images, if not the sunniest.
Sunday morning in Killarney was cold and dark; but atmospheric. I made some of my most memorable images, if not the sunniest.
Cold rain greeted us at Farranfore. It has been 18 years and some months since I first visited this classic Irish station. I wouldn't expect that 076 in gray paint has been here very often. Except for rail tours and the infrequent per way train, the Kerry Road is a locomotive free zone.
Cold rain greeted us at Farranfore. It has been 18 years and some months since I first visited this classic Irish station. I wouldn’t expect that 076 in gray paint has been here very often. Except for rail tours and the infrequent per way train, the Kerry Road is a locomotive free zone.
Is that an authentic Irish spelling for 'Tralee'. I noted no less than three variations on official signage.
Is that an authentic Irish spelling for ‘Tralee’? I noted no less than three variations on official signage.
This was a bit of a shock; tracks lifted in front of the old cabin at Tralee. I remember sitting up in the cabin chatting with the signalman back in the late 1990s.
This was a bit of a shock; tracks lifted in front of the old cabin at Tralee. I remember sitting up in the cabin chatting with the signalman back in the late 1990s.
Palisade fencing in the old good yard complicated photography. Thankfully my Lumix LX7 is very thin.
Palisade fencing in the old goods yard complicated photography at Tralee. Thankfully my Lumix LX7 is very thin.
Another change of engine at Waterford. Here 077 took over from 076. A view across the Suir toward the old Viking town.
Another change of engine at Waterford. Here 077 took over from 076. A view across the Suir toward the old Viking town.
A plaque to William Dargan at Carlow on the Kilkenny to Cherryville line.
A plaque to William Dargan at Carlow on the Kilkenny to Cherryville line.
Local folks were bemused by the disgorging of passengers at Athy and frantic efforts to make photos in the 7 minutes allowed for the stop.
Local folks were bemused by the disgorging of passengers at Athy and frantic efforts to make photos in the 7 minutes allowed for the stop. (engine 079 took over at Kilkenny).

I’ll be posting more photos from the popular trip soon!

Tracking the Light is a Daily Photographic Blog.

Eight Lumix LX7 Candid views of the Railway Preservation Society of Ireland’s Dublin Rivera Excursions.

 

I like to have at least two cameras handy. This especially true when I’m in a situation where photographic opportunities are rapidly unfolding.

These days I usually have both my FujiFilm X-T1 and Lumix LX7 at the ready.

Both are very good image-making machines, yet each has its strengths.

My Lumix is great for candid views and situations where it isn’t necessary or practical to have the camera at eye level. Often I use strictly with the live-view rear screen.

Panoramic view inside one of RPSI's Cravens carriages.
Panoramic composite view inside one of RPSI’s Cravens carriages.

This is a selection of photographs of last Sunday’s (3 April 2016) Dublin Rivera steam excursions operated by the Railway Preservation Society of Ireland.

Cravens carriage prepped and ready for passengers.
Cravens carriage prepped and ready for passengers.
The day's scheduled running times as per Irish Rail.
The day’s scheduled running times as per Irish Rail.
Footplate crew at Connolly.
Footplate crew at Connolly.
Engine 461 at Connolly Station; camera held high at arm's length to clear the heads of spectators on the platform.
Engine 461 at Connolly Station; camera held high at arm’s length to clear the heads of spectators on the platform.

View_from_train_near_Glengeary_

Guards_Van_P1420634

Connolly Station.
Connolly Station.

Tracking the Light Posts Daily.