Tag Archives: Irish Rail

Shows Irish Rail

Irish Rail Four-Wheel Cement—May 2005.

Yesterday, 30 November 2018, I located a collection of my Irish Rail slides from 2005. Among them were these views of ‘bubble cement’  trains (consisting of pressurized four-wheel powdered cement wagons) passing Islandbridge in Dublin on 26thof May that year.

These were exposed on Fujichrome Sensia II (100 ISO) and processed at Photocare on Abbey Street in Dublin.

I scanned these using an Epson V750Pro flatbed scanner making large TIF files, then made colour and contrast adjustments using Lightroom to improve presentation. In addition, I also implemented some digital sharpening to make the photos prior to outputting as scaled JPGs (for Internet presentation) to  make these appear closer to modern digital images.

Irish Rail 134 and 156 lead a Platin to Cork cement train at Islandbridge Junction on 26 May 2005. Exposed using a Contax G2 rangefinder with 45mm Zeiss lens.
Empty cement led by Irish Rail 077 approaches the Phoenix Park Tunnel in Dublin on 26 May 2005. Exposed with a Nikon F3T.

Irish Rail stopped operating cement through Dublin about a decade ago, and so these views are now historic.

Tracking the Light Posts Daily!

 

 

Raccoon at Mallow

Irish Rail has two of it 201 class General Motors diesel painted in a simple livery; silver with a broad black stripe (plus yellow semi-circle upfront). These have been coined ‘raccoons.’

Although 231 had been working the Mark 4 sets on the Dublin-Cork run for several weeks, I was still momentarily puzzled when I spotted the down Cork approaching Mallow back in February 2018.

‘What’s this?’ I thought, expecting something green.

‘Ah! 231, of course.’

I always like it when I get something unexpected, yet if I had known this was approaching, I’d probably have positioned myself on the far platform.

Photos exposed digitally using my FujiFilm XT1 with 18-135mm zoom.

I made some exposure and contrast adjustments to this wide angle view to allow for greater detail and more balanced exposure on the shadow-side of the train.

Tracking the Light Posts Daily

 

 

Classic Chrome: Irish Rail 230 with Bulk Bogie Cement at Limerick Junction.

On 19 May 2003, the sun was shining at Limerick Junction.

I made this view of Irish Rail 230 in Enterprise paint working an up-road bulk-bogie cement from Cork.

Using a Contax G2 rangefinder with 45mm lens, I exposed this view on Fujichrome Sensia II (100 ISO) . Key to my composition was the semaphore to the left of the train.

In 2003, Limerick Junction saw several weekday freights; today there are no revenue freight moves on this part of the system.

In recent weeks, Limerick Junction has been undergoing another major reconfiguration to install a platform on the south side of the Cork-Dublin line.

Tracking the Light Posts Every Day.

Two in One (view); Class 201s 228 and 229 together on 23 September 2018.

In more than 20 years of photographing Irish Rail, 23 September 2018 was the first time I’d photographed a pair of 201s together on a train.

FujiFilm XT1 photo.

I’d been alerted by folks on the Cork-end of the railway that this unusual move was on it way to Dublin. Although the Cork – Dublin Mark 4 with 229 and 228 arrived after sunset, myself and Jay Monaghan documented this unusual occurrence at Heuston Station.

FujiFilm XT1 photo.

I made photos using my FujiFilm XT1 and Lumix LX7 digital cameras.

Successfully capturing unusual or unique events are among the challenges of the railway photographer.

Lumix LX7 photo.
FujiFilm XT1 photo.

Tracking the Light Posts Daily!

Irish Rail at Portarlington, Then and Now Views: Deja Vu all over again.

I was trolling through the archives searching for views of Irish Rail’s Mark 2 airbrake carriages and came across this view of class 071 locomotive 088 at Portarlington in summer 1998.

Irish Rail 088 leads a westward train of Mark 2 airbrake carriages at Portarlington in summer 1988. Exposed on Fujichrome Sensia (100 ISO) using a Nikon F3T with 135mm lens.

It makes for a fascinating comparison with a similar photo I made of the same locomotive hauling the recent Railway Preservation Society of Ireland autumn tour arriving at the modern Portarlington station.

Same locomotive, same location, looking the same direction but viewed more than 20 years apart. The tracks have been re-aligned, platforms extended, new footbridge constructed, and houses built in the distance, while 088 now wears Irish Rail’s gray and yellow livery.

In retrospect, I wish I’d located the vintage photograph prior to the tour so I could more closely match the angle.

The 1998 view is made from the old footbridge which is now out of service. The October 2018 photo was exposed from the modern footbridge, which is situated further east and slightly higher.

Tracking the Light Posts Everyday!

Irish Rail 227 in Three Photos.

Irish Rail 227 is another of the workhorse 201 class diesels.

This is part of my continuing series featuring Irish Rail’s Class 201s to commemorate my 20 years of photography on Irish Railways.

Irish Rail 227 works down road at Cherryville Junction on 6 May 2000. Exposed using a Nikon N90S fitted 400mm Tokina Lens on Fujichrome Sensia II (100 ISO).
Connolly shed, the rarely photographed end of 227.

Tracking the Light Posts Every Day!

 

 

Victorian Railway: Cobh Branch at Woodhill, Tivoli, Cork.

Irish Rail’s Cobh Branch retains a Victorian character running east from Kent Station through Woodhill, Tivoli in Cork City.

Cast iron foot bridges and terrace houses facing the line make for a classic setting.

On weekday mornings 2600 railcars pass every few minutes on their way to and from Midleton and Cobh.

I made these views using my FujiFilm XT1 during a visit three weeks ago.

12mm Zeiss Touit lens.

Tracking the Light Posts Daily

Irish Rail and Autumn Colours in County Cork

Earlier this month, Ken Fox and I explored railways in County Cork.

Rusty autumnal foliage enhanced the pastoral scenery.

I made these views using my FujiFilm XT1. By warming the colour temperature I made the most of the season.

Trailing view of an Irish Rail ICR heading toward Mallow from Kent Station Cork seen near Rathduff, Co. Cork.
Looking toward Cork City at Mourne Abbey.
View near Mourne Abbey, October 2018.
Irish Rail Mark4 set from Dublin to Cork near Mourne Abbey.

Tracking the Light Posts Daily!

Variety and Colour at Howth Junction in Eight Views—October 2018.

Howth Junction is a double junction (two running lines) where the Howth Branch diverges from the Dublin-Belfast main line.

Both routes are electrified for DART (Dublin Area Rapid Transit) services.

I made these views digitally using my FujiFilm X-T1 on a visit with Jay Monaghan last week.

In addition to DART electric trains, I made photos of Irish Rail diesel suburban services, the Dublin-Belfast Enterpriselong distance train, and a laden Tara Mines zinc freight.

Some autumn foliage near the junction made the location more colourful.

Dublin bound DART departs Howth Junction.

A DART train from Howth enters the main line. DART is now scheduled on ten minute intervals.
Malahide bound DART approaching the down platforms.
The same train as above paused at the platforms for passengers.
The Belfast bound Enterprise doesn’t stop for passengers at Howth Junction.
Irish Rail 077 leads the laden Tara Mines run toward Dublin port.
Irish Rail 29000-series CAF built diesel railcars head toward Dublin.

Tracking the Light Posts Daily!

I went to the Shops and Scored Three Cool Trains!

I went to the Shops and Scored Three Cool Trains!

Yesterday was a bright sunny morning in Dublin. I coordinated my walk to SuperValu at Heuston South Quarter to neatly coincide with the passage of Irish Rail’s IWT Liner.

I timed this well and only waited a few minutes at Islandbridge Junction. Rather than my normal angle from ‘the box’, I opted for an over the wall view a little further up.

Irish Rail 077 leads the down IWT Liner at Islandbridge Junction.

Continuing along St. John’s Road toward Dublin Heuston Station, I was surprised to hear another 071. I peered over the wall to discover that Irish Rail 073 (in heritage orange paint) had come down to shunt Belmond’s Grand Hibernian.

Hearing the distinct sounds of an EMD turbocharged 645 diesel tempted me to look over the wall as I walked along the St Johns Road toward Supervalu. This is what I saw; Irish Rail 073 moving down to shunt the Belmond cruise train. An ICR (InterCity Railcar) sits by the valeting plant.
Walking back from SuperValu, I made this view of 073 shunting Belmond’s Grand Hibernian consist.

Dashing to SuperValu, accomplished my shopping in record time, and returned trackside to catch 073 bringing the Grand Hibernianthrough the wash, and then stopped in front of me at Islandbridge Junction. As this was happening Paul Maguire sent me text to alert me that the elusive Sperry train was on its way over to me.

The view from the box of 073 shunting the Belmond train through the carriage wash. I’ve made slight enhancements to the image to make the most of the dramatic autumnal sky and lighten shadows.

Minutes later, Irish Rail 076 with Sperry came across to Platform 10 where it was scheduled to run around before heading to Bray.

Blocked by the Belmond! When one cool train gets in the way of another. Yet, the two trains together are the real story. I can’t say that previously I’d ever photographed the Belmond and Sperry train at the same time.

I walked around to Conyngham Road to catch the Sperry train on its way into the Phoenix Park Tunnel.

Not bad for a trip to the shops!

An Irish Rail ICR is working toward Connolly Station as viewed from the Conyngham Road. In the distance is the Sperry train opposite Platform 10 at Heuston Station.  I’ve made slight enhancements to the image to make the most of the dramatic autumnal sky and lighten shadows.
Irish Rail 076 throttles up as it leads the Sperry rail testing train into the Phoenix Park tunnel. I’ve made slight enhancements to the image to make the most of the dramatic autumnal sky and lighten shadows.

Tracking the Light Posts Everyday!

Glounthaune Sunrise—Cobh Junction Glint in 3 photos.

Last week on a visit to Cork, I made these views of Irish Rail’s 2600 railcars working Cork-Cobh and Cork-Midleton services from Glounthaune village looking across the water toward Glounthaune/Cobh Junction station.

I was working with my FujiFilm XT1 and Canon EOS-3 cameras. The Canon was loaded with Provia 100F, and we’ll have to wait for the slides to be processed.

Regular Tracking the Light readers know that I often favor low-light ‘glint’.

This is tricky light to expose satisfactorily. It is a matter of getting the balance between highlights and shadows right, which is a subjective decision on the part of the photographer.

Which is your favourite?

Tracking the Light Posts Daily.

 

 

Irish Rail 226 and its Great Southern & Western Railway Commemorative Plate.

Irish Rail 226 is unique because of commemorative plate(s) it carries on the sides of the locomotive.

Here’s a selection of digital photos I exposed of 226 at Portarlington on 13 October 2018.

Irish Rail 226’s commemorative plate.
A dreary morning at Portarlington. Lumix LX7 photo.
Lumix LX7 photo on 13 October, 2018. A few hours later this camera failed. Thankfully, I have others to work with.

Sometimes a detailed photograph says more than an overall view. What do you think?

 

Tracking the Light Posts Every Day!

 

 

Rails along the River Slaney—Killurin, County Wexford.

Irish Rail’s line from Dublin to Rosslare hugs the River Slaney north of Wexford town.

On our exploration of disused lines in county Wexford, Ken Fox, Donncha Cronin and I made a short detour to photography the ‘Up-Rosslare’ at Killurin as it ran along the west bank of the Slaney.

This is a pretty part of the line, and a place I hadn’t explored in almost a decade.

The last time I’d made a photo here, it was a 141-class diesel hauling the then ‘new’ weedsprayer. That wasn’t yesterday!

Telephoto view at Killurin.
From the Slaney bridge at Killurin.
This trailing view reminds me of Maine Central’s Rockland Branch.

These images were made with my FujiFilm XT1 with 18-135mm zoom, files adjusted for contrast and exposure in Lightroom.

Tracking the Light posts every day!

 

More Rain; 8 More Views of the RPSI Train.

It was cloudy in Dublin; it was lashing rain in Ennis.

At no time did we see the sun.

Yet, it was a rewarding trip, and I’m happy with my photos.

I made these views of Railway Preservation Society of Ireland’s ‘The Southwestern’ diesel tour using my FujiFilm XT1.

Portarlington.

Limerick.
Ennis, Co Clare.
Athenry, Co. Galway.
Athenry, Co. Galway.
Athenry, Co. Galway.
Connolly Station in Dublin.

More to follow!

Tracking the Light Posts Daily!

Faces, Places and Engines—RPSI’s The Southwestern Tour—10 Views.

Although it was dark, wet and cold, I made a lot of photos of yesterday’s Railway Preservation Society of Ireland ‘The Southwestern’ tour.

These views were exposed using my FujiFilm XT1.

For me these tours are as much about the people as where we go or the equipment we travel on.

More photos soon!

Crew van.

Crew van.
Noel Enright at Mallow.
Limerick.
Limerick.

Ennis.
The gang at Gort.

 

Noel gives the green flag at Athenry.

Tracking the Light Posts Daily!

 

Irish Rail at Bagenalstown, October 2018—Fuji Zoom Lens Exercise.

As I got off the down Waterford train from Dublin at Bagenalstown, County Carlow, I immediately began considering photo options. I didn’t have much time, because the train was only in the station for a couple of minutes.

I took a position at the back of the Irish Rail ICR adjacent to the old station building, and made a series of digital photos using my FujiFilm XT1 with 18-135mm Fuji zoom lens.

I’ve selected two of the sequence here: One wide angle, one telephoto; same camera, same location, same vantage point, same railcar, but different focal lengths.

JPG from a RAW file that was adjusted for contrast and colour in post processing.
Telephoto view from a Camera produced JPG without adjustment except for scaling.

Tracking the Light Posts Every Day.

Irish 082 Five Years Apart—Same Job.

Irish Rail operates International Warehousing & Transport (IWT) container liner freights five to six days per week between Dublin Port and Ballina, County Mayo.

On 3 October 2013, Colm O’Callaghan and I photographed Irish Rail 082 working the down IWT Liner at Clondalkin on the quad track section of the Dublin-Cork line. Back then the locomotive wore the now obsolete black, silver and yellow ‘freight’ livery.

Five years ago: Irish 082 on 3 October 2013 working down road at Clondalkin. Exposed using a Canon EOS-7D with 200mm lens.

On 1 October 2018, two days ago, I caught the very same locomotive working the up IWT liner at Blackhorse Avenue in Dublin. It’s now in battle ship gray paint, as are most of the 071s, except numbers 071 and 073 that are dressed in heritage paint.

Irish Rail’s up-IWT liner approached Blackhorse Avenue on 1 October 2018. Exposed digitally using a FujiFilm XT1 with 90mm telephoto lens. Notice how I’ve exposed for backlighting and used the arched bridge to frame up the train, while minimizing the effects of a bright sky. Image adjusted in post processing for contrast, exposure and colour saturation.

Tracking the Light Posts Every Day.

 

 

 

Irish Rail 077 with Belmond; Three Days—Harsh Light, Soft Light and an ICR.

Over the last few days, I’ve intercepted Belmond’s Grand Hibernianin my neighborhood three times. All hauled by Irish Rail class 071 number 077.

In each instance the lighting was less than calendar perfect.

In each instance I made digital images to best suit the scene.

Hints of autumn foliage dot the Dublin landscape, and soon Belmond’s train will conclude its touring season.

Irish Rail 077 approaches the Phoenix Park Tunnel. Backlighting helps accentuate autumn foliage. FujiFilm XT1 with 18-135mm zoom lens.
Wide angle view from the same vantage point as above: Irish Rail 077 approaches the Phoenix Park Tunnel. Backlighting helps accentuate autumn foliage. FujiFilm XT1 with 18-135mm zoom lens.
Sunday morning at Memorial Road, Irish Rail 077 works towards Waterford. Lumix LX7 photo. 30 September 2018.

 

The Grand Hibernian working toward Heuston on Monday 1 October 2018 passes and Irish Rail ICR in the gullet. Fujifilm XT1 with 90mm lens.

Tracking the Light Posts Everyday!

Enterprising Patterns at Connolly

Real black & white under a Victorian-era train shed.

Here’s some views I made of the Enterprise in August 2018 using my Canon EOS-3 with a 40mm lens with Fuji Acros 100 film.

I like the reflections in the windows.

Sometimes its fun to play with the level. Is this an improvement or an annoyance?

Tracking the Light Posts Everyday!

 

Irish Rail 224: 20 Years In Ireland: Irish Rail class 201 Retrospective

I’ve been exploring and photographing Irish railways since 1998. To mark my twenty years photography, I’ve been displaying images of each of Irish Rail’s 201-class General Motors diesels in numerical order.

Today’s locomotive is 224, seen above  a while back in a view that’s up-close and personal. The introduction photo was made on 17 March 2017 in a curve between Mourne Abbey and Rathduff, Co. Cork. A green loco for St. Patricks Day.

Tracking the Light Posts Every Day!

Irish Rail 071 Leads the Grand Hibernian—Variations on a Theme.

I’ve been unusually fortunate to catch Irish Rail’s 071 almost everyday for the last couple of weeks.

This locomotive is the class leader and features a heritage livery based on the as-delivered General Motors scheme.

It is very popular with photographers.

On Saturday 22 September 2018, locomotive 071 worked the Belmond Grand Hibernian cruise train from Dublin Heuston to Connolly Station. Until yesterday, it had been assigned to the Dublin-Ballina IWT Liner container train.

To make this view, I used my FujiFilm XT1 fitted with a Zeiss Touit 12mm lens. To help bring in sky detail, I attached a Lee 0.9 graduated neutral density filter (a physical filter), then made further adjustment to RAW files in post processing using a digitally applied graduated neutral density filter, which allowed me to make adjustments to highlight and shadow detail.

Additional adjustments were made globally (the entire image) to modify contrast and colour saturation to improve the appearance of the photograph.

Compare these images with my earlier post: Irish Rail 071 in Retro Orange and Lessons in Exposing for RAW Adjustment 

A view from Dublin’s Conyngham Road above the south portal of the Phoenix Park Tunnel on the branch that runs from Islandbridge Junction toward Connolly Station.

Thanks to Paul Maguire for lending me an SD card! (I’d left mine in the computer, and the spare on my desk, and the second spare in my other bag! Poor show on my part.)

Tracking the Light Posts Every Day!

 

Colourful Sunday at Connolly.

Sunday, 16 September 2018 found unusual variety at Irish Rail’s Dublin Connolly Station.

Adding colour  to Irish Rail’s parade of local and long distance trains was Belmond’s Grand Hibernian that arrived from Dundalk, and departed a half an hour later bound for Waterford. As this high-end cruise train was departing, a HOBS (ballast train) was heading from the northern line into the North Wall with Irish Rail 077.

But the most unusual train was Rail Preservation Society of Ireland’s heritage Cravens, which arrived from Inchicore behind one of Northern Ireland Railways Enterprise class 201 diesels.  While the train was expected, the locomotive was a surprise.

Belmond’s Grand Hibernian arrives at Connolly station led by the specially painted Irish Rail 216.
Dublin-Belfast Enterprise is on platform 2, a 29000-series CAF railcar is on platform 3, and the Belmond train on 4.
The 10am Enterprise departs as Irish Rail 083 has coupled up to the Belmond for the trip to Waterford.
A DART suburban train accelerates away from Connolly.
I wasn’t expecting this combination! One of NIR’s Enterprise painted 201s with the RPSI heritage train.
You can’t be two places at one time! But here we have a photographers conundrum, Belmond’s Sunday departure for Waterford occurred as a the more elusive HOBS (ballast train) takes the switch at East Wall Junction for Dublin’s North Wall. (notice the 071 diesel at far right).

I departed for points north before steam locomotive number 4 arrived to take the scheduled RPSI excursion from platform 5. All the while, engine 85 in Great Northern blue, which was intended for the day’s RPSI excursion was stuck on Connolly’s turntable!

Tracking the Light Posts Daily.

 

 

Irish Rail 071 in Retro Orange and Lessons in Exposing for RAW Adjustment

Friday, 21 September 2018, I knew that Irish Rail 071 would be working the up IWT Liner. This bright orange locomotive would allow me to make a dramatic photo in a situation where a grey or silver locomotive wouldn’t be as effective.

Selecting my vantage point from the Old Cabra Road in Dublin, I faced an unusually contrasty situation. Dramatic fluffly clouds were racing across the sky, rapidly alternating between bright backlit sun and a relatively dark scene with a distant bright sky.

To make the most of this, I used my Lumix LX7 to make a couple of test photos. Then opted to under expose my final photo by about 1/3 of stop. This would allow me to retain a bit of detail in the sky, which I could then adjust in post processing.

My first test shot. This is a Jpg made without contrast, colour, or other image adjustment taken directly from the Camera RAW file.
My second test shot; from the camera Jpg without post processing.
This is the unmodified camera Jpg. Notice the relative darkness of the cutting compared with the sky.

The final photos required several steps of adjustment  to the RAW file.

1) I applied a digital graduated neutral density filter to bring in the sky highlights

2) I warmed up the overall colour temperature to counter act the prevalent blue light as result of the heavy shadows.

3) Contrast was softened.

4) Shadows lightened

5) A radial filter was applied to the front of the engine to lighten it slightly.

6) I increased the overall colour saturation slightly to counter the effects of dull lighting in the cutting.

Screen shot of the Lightroom work window for my first adjusted version of the RAW image.
My first attempt at modifying the RAW image.
My second modified RAW file. This one is warmer and involved a second graduated neutral density filter to enhance the sky.

Tracking the Light Posts Daily.

Steam at Drogheda—Sunday, 16 September 2018; Five Digital Photos.

Working with two digital cameras, I made these images at Irish Rail’s Drogheda Station. This is a classic Great Northern Railway (Ireland) railway station with a curved platform, antique brick buildings and elegant old-school platform canopies.

But it also features more modern elements too, such as palisade fencing and a diesel railcar depot and wash.

Is it honest to exclude the modern elements and just focus on the antique? Or is it better to allow for mix of new and old? After all the photos were made digitally in 2018, not on film in the days of yore.

RPSI’s Cravens carriages are paused on the platform at Drogheda. How do you feel about the orange safety vests and modern signage?
Telephoto view looking toward Dublin from the footbridge.
There’s a vintage signal display at Drogheda station on the platform.
Detail of engine number 4. So how about the Nike footwear at the top of the image?
Drogheda signal cabin lacks the classic charm of its Victorian ancestors, but it is part of the modern scene, so there it is!

Tracking the Light Posts EVERYDAY to discusses Photographic Technique and Process.

Mix and Unmatched at the Gullet—Variety on Irish Rail.

Who said that Irish Rail is boring?

Patience and being-there can make the difference.

On the Evening of 16 September 2018, the Railway Preservation Society Ireland’s Cravens transfer (train  i.d. H260) ran from Connolly to Irish Rail’s Inchicore Works. Rather than run with an 071 class locomotive, as is often the case, it was assigned locomotive 216 specially painted for Belmond’s Grand Hibernian.

Exposed with a FujiFilm XT1 with 90mm lens.
Gullet glint! Trailing view of RPSI’s Cravens transfer. Exposed with a FujiFilm XT1 with 90mm lens.

The following morning, the up Grand Hibernianfrom Waterford passed the same location with Irish Rail class 071 number 083 in the lead.

While Belmond’s train often runs to and from Waterford with an 071 class locomotive, this still presents a bit variety on a railway that tends to favour uniform train sets.

All  of these photos were exposed at ‘The Gullet” (the three track throat to Islandbridge Junction) from Memorial Road in Dublin.

Lumix LX7 photo.
Trailing view looking toward Islandbridge. Exposed with a Lumix LX7.

Tracking the Light Posts Daily!

Today, 12 September 2018, Irish Rail 071 worked the down IWT Liner.

Monday on Tracking the Light, I posted my foiled attempts at picturing Irish Rail’s heritage painted 071 on Belmond’s Grand Hibernian.

Persistence pays off. Well, that coupled with a bit of luck.

A few minutes ago (12 September 2018), I returned on spec to my oft-photographed location at Islandbridge Junction for the down International Warehousing & Transport container train (Irish Rail’s IWT Liner that runs Dublin to Ballina, Co. Mayo).

I expected locomotive 234, which has been working this run for a while. Instead, I was rewarded with 071 in glossy orange paint. The clear sunny morning was an added bonus.

Here are two versions. One is the in-camera JPG using the FujiFilm ‘Velvia’ colour profile. The other is an adjusted file from the camera RAW, where I’ve lightened shadows and adjusted saturation and contrast. You can like one or both.

Irish Rail 071 at Islandbridge Junction in Dublin with Wellington Testimonial. Camera JPG featuring Fuji Velvia colour profile. Scaled for internet.
Camera RAW file, exported to Lightroom and modified for contrast and colour saturation to improve overall appearance. (Specifically to better balance the shadow areas, especially on the front of the locomotive.)

If these don’t work for you, I also made a Fujichrome Provia 35mm colour slide using at 40mm lens that takes in the whole scene.

For more about IWT see: http://www.iwt-irl.com

Tracking the Light Posts Everyday!

Bad Luck with the Belmond!

Two Sunday Mornings in a row I walked up to the line with an aim of catching an 071 class locomotive in heritage paint leading Belmond’s Grand Hiberniancruise train on its run from Dublin Connolly to Waterford.

Two Sundays, two locations, two heritage locomotives (numbers 073 and 071 respectively), and two different Irish Rail scheduled trains that got in my way.

Gosh, bad luck!

In both instances, I came away with different photos than I’d set out to make.

Irish Rail 073 leads Belmond’s Grand Hibernian in Dublin on 2 September 2018. An Irish Rail intercity rail car destined for Heuston Station is stopped at a red signal. Bad luck! The Belmond train was running a few minutes behind the advertised.
Bright sun, fluffy clouds, elevation, all the elements for a calendar perfect image. Oh no, an ICR! Shoo shoo!
Well, that didn’t work out as hoped! But then again, I have a zillion photos here anyway.

My question: might these photos age well? Perhaps the intrusion of the ROTEM ICRs may make these photographs more interesting in years to come?

 

I’m not one to get overly excited when a photo opportunity doesn’t work as planned. Sometimes it’s best to just keep making photos when a scene plays out.

PSSSST! (I also made some sneaky 35mm slides that may make the most of both situations).

Tracking the Light Posts Daily!

Irish Rail 079 leads RPSI Cravens.

On Monday, 3 September 2018, Irish Rail 079 worked Railway Preservation Society of Ireland’s preserved Cravens carriages, running as an empty train from Dublin’s Inchicore Works to Connolly station.

This was a scheduled move to position the heritage train for RPSI’s private charter to Killarney, County Kerry with steam locomotive 85 (featured in earlier Tracking the Light Posts).

Working with my FujiFilm XT1 and 90mm lens, I photographed from the north end of Connolly platform 1 & 2.

The train was slightly backlit. To compensate, I made nominal adjustment to the Fuji RAW file to lighten shadows in post processing, then exported as a scaled JPG for internet presentation.

Irish Rail’s Ken Fox is at the throttle of General Motors-built class 071 number 079 approaching Dublin Connolly station.

For details about the RPSI and scheduled steam and diesel trips see:

https://www.steamtrainsireland.com

Brian Solomon’s Tracking the Light Posts Every Day!

 

Ireland’s Oldest Railway.

The Dublin & Kingstown commenced operations in 1834. Today, the line is part of Irish Rail’s national network and also hosts Dublin Area Rapid Transit suburban electric trains.

In August 2018, I exposed this view of the down evening Dublin-Rosslare passenger train approaching Blackrock along the shore of Dublin Bay.

I like the modern candy-apple green livery that now graces some of Irish Rail 29000-series diesel railcars, and I find that it works especially well in a scene such as this one.

To make for a more appealing photograph, I imported the camera RAW into Lightroom and made a few minor adjustments to contrast and color temperature. Among my most important changes was to lighten the shadow areas to more closely represent what we see with our eyes.

Tracking the Light Posts Daily!

 

 

Irish Rail 223 Then and Now.

1998 and 2018

As it happens, Irish Rail 223 was one of the first Irish locomotives I put on film.

I made this view at Tralee back in February 1998. Expose with a Nikon F3T on Fujichrome slide film.

Additional views of 223 were exposed digitally in recent weeks.

Irish Rail 223 leads the up IWT liner from Ballina at Islandbridge in Dublin on a August 2018 evening.
The next day, 223 works the down IWT liner at Islandbridge Junction. One a locomotive is assigned to the IWT liner it often works if for several days in a row.

Comparatively little rolling stock in service back in 1998 remain active on Irish Rail today.

Who could have guessed that I’d be making photos of Irish Rail 223 more than 20 years after I caught it at Tralee on that cloudy Febraury morning!

Tracking the Light Posts Every Day!

Belmond’s Grand Hibernian on the Middle Road.

On Sunday’s an Irish Rail class 071 works Belmond’s luxury cruise train, the 10-car Grand Hibernian, on its run from Dublin Connolly to Waterford.

Although slightly back lit, I found the famed ‘Gullet’ offers a good place to catch this train at work.

This cutting dates from the 1840s and features three tracks.

In this instance, Irish Rail 082 was accelerating down the middle road with the posh-looking train. (‘Down’ refers to traveling away from Dublin, and doesn’t reflect the gradient, which in this situation is actually rising).

Working with both my FujiFilm XT1 with 90mm telephoto and Lumix LX7, I made two sets of digital photos.

Irish 082 with Belmond’s Grand Hibernian cruise train. FujiFilm XT1 with 90mm lens.
Lumix LX7 view.

The locomotive sound was impressive as on this particular Sunday a couple weeks back the roads in the area were shut for a foot race and there was very little ambient noise compared with a typical day in Dublin. Perhaps, I should have made a recording!

Tracking the Light Posts Daily.

Irish Rail 222—The Bishop.

Many Irish Rail locomotives have nicknames. Engine 222 is ‘The Bishop’ or ‘Bishop Tutu’, which is an allusion to its number.

Over the last 20 years, I’ve caught this locomotive at many places across the Irish network.

Irish Rail 222 working push-pull set at Cherryville Junction on 20 September 2002. Exposed on Fujichrome with a Nikon.
10 June 2006; An electrical power cut at Westport, County Mayo had required the use of portable generators at the station. In addition to the discordant cacophony at the normally peaceful location, this had resulted in some unusual moves to get trains positioned properly, such as this view of 222 with Mark 3s beyond the station to the West.

See: DAILY POST: Timber and General Motors, June 10, 2006 

Irish Rail 222 works a Dublin to Cork Mark4 set nearing Kent Station, Cork.
Now officially 02-10222. The Bishop basks in the evening sun at Heuston Station in Dublin.
Working the IWT liner from Dublin to Ballina, at my all to often photographed location at Islandbridge in Dublin. Exposed digitally using my FujiFilm XT1.

Tracking the Light Posts every day!

 

 

 

Irish Rail Workhorse Diesel; The Unremarked 221 in four photos.

Here’s four views of Irish Rail 221; two film, two digital; two orange, two green & silver; two with passenger, two with freight; one in snow, three without; but all showing this machine on the move.

221 leads the down Dublin-Cork liner at Ballybrophy on 25 March 2005. Exposed on Fujichrome Velvia 100F using a Nikon F3 with 180mm lens.

This is part of my on-going series depicting Ireland’s class 201 diesel electrics to mark my 20 years photographing in Ireland. Photographic details in the captions.

Irish Rail 221 leading Mark 3 carriages at Kildare on a damp summer day in 2005. Exposed on Fujichrome Velvia 100F using a Nikon F3 with 180mm lens.
Freshly painted 221 (with expanded number) leads the down IWT liner (Dublin to Ballina container train) at Islandbridge Junction in Dublin. Exposed digitally using a FuijFilm XT1 with 90mm Fujinon telephoto lens. Notice the effect of scale with the monument visually positioned over the locomotive. The date of exposure was 21 September 2017.
Irish Rail 221 in the snow at Islandbridge in Dublin on 28 February 2018. Exposed digitally with a FujiFilm XT1 and 27mm pancake lens.

Question: do head-on telephoto views portray the shape of the 201-class effectively?

Tracking the Light Posts Daily!