Tag Archives: ICR

Irish Rail at Bagenalstown, October 2018—Fuji Zoom Lens Exercise.

As I got off the down Waterford train from Dublin at Bagenalstown, County Carlow, I immediately began considering photo options. I didn’t have much time, because the train was only in the station for a couple of minutes.

I took a position at the back of the Irish Rail ICR adjacent to the old station building, and made a series of digital photos using my FujiFilm XT1 with 18-135mm Fuji zoom lens.

I’ve selected two of the sequence here: One wide angle, one telephoto; same camera, same location, same vantage point, same railcar, but different focal lengths.

JPG from a RAW file that was adjusted for contrast and colour in post processing.
Telephoto view from a Camera produced JPG without adjustment except for scaling.

Tracking the Light Posts Every Day.

Two Too Many Twos at Connolly?

Sometimes a number catches my attention.

The other day I made two photos of Irish Rail 02 22222 arriving at Connolly Station, Dublin.

If I hadn’t had my Lumix LX7 with me and ready to go, I might have been too late to make this photo. And that would have been too bad.

Irish Rail 02 22222 at platform 5, Dublin’s Connolly Station. Lumix LX7 photo.

Tracking the Light Posts Daily.

Irish Rail ICR’s with a pastel sky at Kildare.

Irish Rail Intercity Railcars work downroad (away from Dublin) at Kildare.
Irish Rail Intercity Railcars work downroad (away from Dublin) at Kildare.

To make the most of this scene I needed to make some global (overall) and localized contrast adjustments in Lightroom. This was necessary to compensate for the contrast characteristics inherent to the digital file produced by my FujiFilm X-T1.

I worked with the RAW file which has substantially more data than the in-camera JPG (which is compressed and thus offers very little information above what is immediately visible to the eye).

Tracking the Light posts daily.

Irish Rail Passenger Trains; Grab Shot in the Gullet, Dublin.

The other day I was at the St. John’s Road roundabout. A Mark4 set was blocked as an in-bound ICR (intercity railcar) bound for Dublin’s Heuston Station over took it on the middle road.

The Gullet is the three track section in a cutting on approach to Islandbridge Junction in Dublin.
The Gullet is the three track section in a cutting on approach to Islandbridge Junction in Dublin.

Using my Lumix LX-7, I made this photo by holding the camera over the wall and gauging composition from the live-view digital display at the back of the camera.

I lightened the shadows in post-processing to improve contrast.

For the next couple of weeks Tracking the Light will be on auto-pilot while Brian is on the road. Posts should appear daily having been pre-programmed into the holding queue.

New Posts Every Day (hopefully).

 

Irish Rail to Sallins, July 27 2014

Sun, Clouds, Rain,  Railcars and . . .

Yes all true, but I’d traveled down to catch the return leg of steam hauled The Marble City rail tour operated by the Railway Preservation Society Ireland.

Earlier in the day I’d photographed the train departing Dublin (as featured in yesterday’s Tracking the Light post The Marble City Tour at Islandbridge.)

I departed Dublin Heuston on the 1430 suburban train heading for Sallins. I was fortunate to travel on a five-piece intercity rail car (ICR), which was comfortable and mostly empty.

Interior of my train at Heuston Station Dublin. Lumix LX7 photo.
Interior of my train at Heuston Station Dublin. Lumix LX7 photo.
Irish Rail's Rotem-built Intercity Rail Cars are comfortable trains. Lumix LX7.
Irish Rail’s Rotem-built Intercity Rail Cars are comfortable trains. Lumix LX7.

Arriving Sallins, County Kildare at 2:55pm, I had time for a leisurely bacon and cabbage lunch at the Lock 13 Pub—located along the Grand Canal a short walk from the station. I’d arranged to meet fellow photographer Hugh Dempsey after 4pm to explore some track side locations nearly in anticipation of photographing locomotive 461 with The Marble City.

The Lock 13 Pub at Sallins, County Kildare. Lumix LX7 photo.
The Lock 13 Pub at Sallins, County Kildare. Lumix LX7 photo.
Sallins station with a foreboding sky. An ill wind was blowing; beware beware! LX7 photo.
Sallins station with a foreboding sky. An ill wind was blowing; beware beware! LX7 photo.
The 1600 Dublin-Cork ICR approaches Sallins at speed. An automatic voice warns, 'please stand back, train now approaching.' Canon EOS 7D with 200mm lens.
The 1600 Dublin-Cork ICR approaches Sallins at speed. An automatic voice warns, ‘please stand back, train now approaching.’ Canon EOS 7D with 200mm lens.
A few minutes later another ICR passes, this time in the Dublin-bound direction. Canon EOS 7D with 200mm lens.
A few minutes later another ICR passes, this time in the Dublin-bound direction. Canon EOS 7D with 200mm lens.

The special was scheduled to depart Athy at 2:55 pm and according to Irish Rail company literature would depart Kildare at precisely 5:23 pm and 30 seconds. Armed with this information we scouted a bridge near milepost 17 and waited.

Shortly after we arrived at milepost 17 the sky opened. It was like standing in Niagara Falls. Canon EOS 7D with 200mm lens.
Shortly after we arrived at milepost 17 the sky opened. It was like standing in Niagara Falls. Canon EOS 7D with 200mm lens.
An uproad ICR races toward Dublin in the rain. Canon EOS 7D with 200mm lens.
An uproad ICR races toward Dublin in the rain. Canon EOS 7D with 200mm lens.

The usual procession of up and down passenger trains passed, mostly using the common Irish Rail Rotem-built ICRs—like the one I’d traveled down on.

The weather changed from sunny to pouring rain rather suddenly; uncomfortable, but not unusual.

We’d expected The Marble City to pass by about 5:50pm. More ICRs up and down, but no sign of the steam. By 6:30pm we were wondering what had gone wrong.

After another hour we learned that there had been a fatality on the line south of Cherryville Junction (where the line to Kilkenny and Waterford diverges from the mainline to Cork) and 461 with The Marble City was being held at Athy! Oh no.

That didn’t bode well at all!

Stay tuned for more. . . . !

The down Dublin to Cork Mark4 approaches milepost 17.
The down Dublin to Cork Mark4 approaches milepost 17.

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Irish Rail Trip to Co. Mayo—Daily Post.

Traveling Across Ireland by Train.

Heuston Station departure board shows the 0735 Galway train with connections to Mayo. I was heading to Foxford, one of the smallest stations on the route. I used a slow shutter speed to capture the LED sign. My exposure was f2.5 at 1/40th of a second.  LEDs are not a constant light source and flicker on and off many times a second. While this isn't perceptible to the naked eye, when photographed a higher shutter speeds the lights may be caught instead of on, which makes it hard to read the signs.
Heuston Station departure board shows the 0735 Galway train with connections to Mayo. I was heading to Foxford, one of the smallest stations on the route. I used a slow shutter speed to capture the LED sign. My exposure was f2.5 at 1/40th of a second. LEDs are not a constant light source and flicker on and off many times a second. While this isn’t perceptible to the naked eye, when photographed at higher shutter speeds the lights may be caught instead of on, which makes it hard to read the signs.

On March 13, 2014, I bought a day-return from Dublin Heuston to Foxford, Co. Mayo, and traveled on the 7:35 am Galway train. My train was well patronized, but I had no difficulty finding a seat.

Rotem-built 22000 series Intercity Rail Cars are Irish Rail's standard passenger consist for most services. On March 13, 2014, ICRs destined for Waterford and Galway were side by side on the platforms at Heuston Station. Lumix LX3 photo.
Rotem-built 22000 series Intercity Rail Cars are Irish Rail’s standard passenger consist for most services. On March 13, 2014, ICRs destined for Waterford and Galway were side by side on the platforms at Heuston Station. Lumix LX3 photo.
Another view of Rotem ICRs at Heuston. My train is the closest to the camera. Exposed with a Lumix LX3.
Another view of Rotem ICRs at Heuston. My train is the closest to the camera. Exposed with a Lumix LX3.

It was foggy in Dublin. Ensconced in my seat, I observed that my train departed Heuston precisely on time and soon was rolling down-road at track speed.

My train was a four-piece Rotem-built Intercity Rail Car, of the type that is now standard for most Irish Rail Intercity services.

Except for some rough spots west of Kildare, the ride quality was comfortable and smooth.

Interior of the Rotem ICR at Heuston Station. Exposed with my Lumix LX3.
Interior of the Rotem ICR at Heuston Station. Exposed with my Lumix LX3.

At Portarlington, we diverged from the Dublin-Cork mainline and traveled on the single track branch toward Athlone. At Clara we crossed (met) an uproad train.

I changed trains at Athone. Here another four piece ICR was waiting to continue the journey toward Co. Mayo. At Castlerea we met the Ballina-Dublin IWT liner, a train I’ve often photographed.

It was as foggy in Athlone as it had been in Dublin. I changed to the ICR on the left. This was destined to Westport.
It was as foggy in Athlone as it had been in Dublin. I changed to the ICR on the left. This was destined to Westport. Notice the LED display boards are impossible to read in the photo. This is an affectation of using a faster shutter speed. A few of the LEDs are on, but many are off. Lumix LX3 photo exposed at f2.1 1/500th. Since the trains are stationary, I probably should have manually set the shutter speed to about 1/30th to better capture the destination boards.

Upon reaching Manulla Junction, I again changed trains, this time for the 2800-series railcar that works the Ballina Branch. Years ago this would have been a single General Motors class 141/181 Bo-Bo diesel electric with a short Craven set.

When I arrived in Foxford I was met by my friend Noel Enright. We spent the rest of daylight photographing trains and visiting friends. I’ll post those adventures soon! Stay tuned.

Interior view of the 2800-series railcar I traveled on between Manulla Junction and Foxford. Lumix LX3 photo.
Interior view of the 2800-series railcar I traveled on between Manulla Junction and Foxford. Lumix LX3 photo.
Foxford, County Mayo. This 2800 will terminate at Ballina, several miles to the north. Lumix LX3.
Foxford, County Mayo. This 2800 will terminate at Ballina, several miles to the north. Lumix LX3.
Noel Enright poses with the driver of my train.
Noel Enright poses with the driver of my train.

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Dublin’s Heuston Station, April 9, 2013.

 

 

Trans-Atlantic Exchange.

ish Rail’s Tony Cooke and Amtrak’s Douglas Kydd at Heuston Station with Intercity Rail Car 22311. Lumix LX-3 photo.
Irish Rail’s Tony Cooke and Amtrak’s Douglas Kydd at Heuston Station with Intercity Rail Car 22311. Lumix LX-3 photo.

Click here for views of Irish Rail 077 in the new livery!

I featured Dublin’s Heuston Station in my 2002 book, Railway Masterpieces. Here’s a an excerpt of my text:

Located near the Guinness Brewery along the south bank of the River Liffey, Dublin’s Heuston Station is a classic example of a railway terminal from the dawn of the railway age. Despite its age it still serves as one of the city’s primary railway stations and is among the oldest railway stations in continuous use in the world. Few stations have survived from the formative age of railways, and far fewer city terminals exist from this period.

  “The Dublin terminal was formerly known as Kingsbridge and was renamed in 1966, along with many other stations in Ireland, as a commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Easter Rising. At this time, railway stations were renamed in honor of participants in the Rising who had been executed by British authorities in the aftermath of the event, so this station is named for Sean Heuston.”

On April 9, 2013, I facilitated a short tour of Heuston for visiting Amtrak locomotive engineer Douglas Kydd who was on vacation in Ireland with his Fiancée. Among the highlights was the opportunity to inspect one Irish Rail’s newest trains.

Irish Rail 22311 and other 22K-series Intercity Railcars under the restored 1840s-era Heuston Station train shed. Lumix LX-3 photo.
Irish Rail 22311 and other 22K-series Intercity Railcars under the restored 1840s-era Heuston Station train shed. Lumix LX-3 photo.
Irish Rail 22311 arrived in Ireland on August 17, 2012 and officially entered traffic on on December 20th last year. It retains the gloss and an aroma of a new car. Lumix LX-3 photo.
Irish Rail 22311 arrived in Ireland on August 17, 2012 and officially entered traffic on on December 20th last year. It retains the gloss and an aroma of a new car. Lumix LX-3 photo.

 

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