Tag Archives: cotton candy sky

Old School at Old Saybrook or Amtrak’s Acela and a Cotton Candy Sky.

 

After reviewing my black & white negatives from the 1980s, I decided it would be productive to use my old camera for some modern photography. So over the last couple of weeks I’ve exposed several rolls of 35mm film and processed them in the darkroom.

Last week I made use of my old Leica 3A at Old Saybrook, Connecticut.

While the passing trains were the primary subject; it was the fleecy cotton-candy sky that really caught my attention.

Successful black & white photography often makes use of texture and contrast. Here the sky worked well.

A New York bound Amtrak High Speed Train (working as an Acela service) blitzes the station at Old Saybrook, Connecticut. Exposed with a 21mm f4.0 Super Angulon. I exposed for the sky, allow other elements of the scene to remain in relative shadow.
A New York bound Amtrak High Speed Train (working as an Acela service) blitzes the station at Old Saybrook, Connecticut. Exposed with a 21mm f4.0 Super Angulon. I exposed for the sky, while allowing other elements of the scene to remain in relative shadow.
Sometimes wires are a nuisance; here they are integral park of the scene. Also rather than emphasize deep rich shadows, I've exposed for the sky to allow this textured area to draw the eye. Old Saybrook, Connecticut.
Sometimes wires are a nuisance; here they are integral park of the scene. Also rather than emphasize deep rich shadows, I’ve exposed for the sky to allow this textured area to draw the eye. Old Saybrook, Connecticut.
Amtrak ACS-64 600 David Gunn pauses at Old Saybrook, Connecticut. Here I've used a Nikkor 35mm lens on my old Leica. Notice how this lens treats the contrast of the scene. Every lens is different, and choosing the best lens for the circumstance is more than merely selecting the desired focal length.
Amtrak ACS-64 600 David Gunn pauses at Old Saybrook, Connecticut. Here I’ve used a Nikkor 35mm lens on my old Leica. Notice how this lens treats the contrast of the scene. Every lens is different, and choosing the best lens for the circumstance is more than merely selecting the desired focal length.

These images were exposed using Fuji Acros 100 negative film; processed in Kodak HC-110 at 1:32 (with water) for 4 minutes 30 seconds with continuous agitation.

Final image processing was done following scanning with Lightroom.

Tracking the Light features photography daily