Tag Archives: NYCTA

New York City’s Number 7 Flushing Line in the Afternoon—12 Photos.

The old IRT Flushing line is the first train-ride that I recall.

My dad brought me on this run before I was taking photos.

I made these images last week using my Lumix LX7.

New York City’s Number 7 Flushing Line’s curving undulating elevated structure offers a multitude of angles.

In the evening rush-hour, Flushing trains run at very short intervals, with outbound expresses using the middle track.

Court Square, Queens.
Court Square, Queens.

For my money, the number 7 remains one of the coolest transit lines in the City. (And not just because of the photography! The AC actually works on some of the cars.)

Outbound express on the middle track at 46th Street and Bliss.
Outbound express on the middle track at 46th and Bliss Streets.
Tail-end of the outbound express at 46th Street.
Tail-end of the outbound express at 46th Street.
A view of the Flushing Line from the Long Island Rail Road platforms at Woodside in Queens.
A view of the Flushing Line from the Long Island Rail Road platforms at Woodside in Queens.
Woodside.
Woodside.
Older cars at 52nd Street.
Older cars at 52nd Street.
View from the back of the train at 52nd street.
View from the back of the train at 52nd street.
46th and Bliss Streets.
46th and Bliss Streets.

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Court Square.
Court Square.
Court Square.
Court Square.

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New York City Subway Collage—July 2016.

Making my way from point to point underground in New York City, I always keep my Lumix at the ready.

Back in the 1970s and 1980s, I made black & white photos of the subway with my old Leica, so I’ve been at this  a while.

The mix of old tiles, modern signs and the continual rush of humanity makes for lots of photographic possibilities.

For ease of exposure I set the Lumix to ‘A’ mode for aperture; wind the lens open to about f1.4/f2; set the white balance to ‘auto’, and release the shutter from below eye level (as required).

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42nd Street.
42nd Street.
28th Street.
28th Street.

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Tracking the Light looks at The El.

Way back in the day, before third rail electrification was the rule, compact steam locomotives worked trains on New York’s elevated railways.

Most of the original Els are long gone, and many of today’s elevated structures spanning streets in The Bronx, Brooklyn, and Queens stem from the electrified era.

Nearly forgotten are the Manhattan Els, all of which were torn down decades ago.

Old postcards survive that show the way things were.

Fujifilm X-T1 digital photograph.
Fujifilm X-T1 digital photograph.
Fujifilm X-T1 digital photograph.
Fujifilm X-T1 digital photograph.

In June, I made these photographs of the elevated structure that survives above the streets at Broadway and Marcy Avenue in Brooklyn. I find it astounding that when Els were more common, they were decried as ‘ugly.’ Simply bizarre.

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When I was a kid these turnstiles scared me. I though for sure I’ll be diced to pieces. Fujifilm X-T1 digital photograph.

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New York City Subway Underground!

In most other cities, such a title might seem to be redundant, but not in New York.

Here are a few digital photographs made in late June, designed to capture the atmosphere of the Subway (but not the aroma). All exposed with a Lumix LX7.

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R-train.
R-train.

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Fulton Street.
Fulton Street.
Franklin Avenue.
Franklin Avenue.
Franklin Avenue
Franklin Avenue.
Photographing the J train.
Photographing the J train.
Cortlandt Street.
Cortlandt Street.
Warning!
Warning!

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Tracking the Light on the A Train; A Post Apocalyptic Railway Journey—12 photos.

  • The far-end of this well-known Subway route was among the lines we explored on our epic June 25, 2015 tour of New York City rail-transit.Jack May, Walter Zullig, my father and I, walked from the Long Island Rail Road station at Far Rockaway to the nearby New York City Subway station (located on an elevated structure).
  • At one time this had all been part of the same route, but now there’s several blocks between rail-heads.
    The A Line Deli at Far Rockaway, amidst the sounds of sirens. Fujifilm X-T1 photo.
    The A Line Deli at Far Rockaway, amidst the sounds of sirens. Fujifilm X-T1 photo.

    Elaborately decorated glass bricks are a feature of the stations on the A Train route.

    NYCTA Station at Far Rockaway is decorated with colored glass. Panoramic composite exposed with Fujifilm X-T1.
    The NYCTA Station at Far Rockaway is decorated with colored glass. Panoramic composite exposed with Fujifilm X-T1.
    Far Rockaway.  Fujifilm X-T1 photo.
    Far Rockaway. Fujifilm X-T1 photo.

    As we rolled westward, my father recalled visiting Rockaway Beach decades earlier when there were rows of beach-side bungalows and city streets.

    Once west of the Far Rockaway the scene changes.We got off at 44th Street and took a look around.

  • Much of Rockaway beach seems devoid of structures, with old streets vanishing into the encroaching sand. The Bungalows are just a memory. Yet, massive multistory apartments loom in the distance above the railway structure, like something out of a doomsday film.
    A concrete elevated structure keeps the tracks above the sand covered streets.
    A concrete elevated structure keeps the tracks above the sand covered streets.
    An inbound A Train from Far Rockaway. Fujifilm X-T1 photo.
    An inbound A Train from Far Rockaway. Fujifilm X-T1 photo.
    This is a strange place, devoid of people with a mixture of urban decay and encroaching beach. Panoramic composite exposed with a Fujifilm X-T1.
    This place, is largely devoid of people (except for visiting photographers) and features a mixture of urban decay and encroaching beach. Panoramic composite exposed with a Fujifilm X-T1.
    An outbound A train rattles along on the elevated. Fujifilm X-T1 photo.
    An outbound A train rattles along on the elevated. Fujifilm X-T1 photo.
     Fujifilm X-T1 photo looking toward Far Rockaway.
    Fujifilm X-T1 photo looking toward Far Rockaway.
    Nice place for a car chase!  Fujifilm X-T1 photo.
    Nice place for a car chase! Fujifilm X-T1 photo.
    Outbound train as seen from the inbound platform at 44st Street.  Fujifilm X-T1 photo.
    Outbound train as seen from the inbound platform at 44th Street. Fujifilm X-T1 photo.
    Inbound A train at 44st Street.  Fujifilm X-T1 photo.
    Inbound A train at 44th Street. Fujifilm X-T1 photo.
    Colored glass at 44th Street.
    Colored glass at 44th Street.

    It’s a strange place to be. And a stranger place to make photos. This is not the New York City visited by most tourists! Yet the A train continues to JFK Airport and beyond to lower Manhattan and ultimately up-town.

    How long, I wonder, would it take to ride from one end to the other?

    Tomorrow: Broadway Junction in East New York.

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New York City Subway—prelude—June 25, 2015.

A large portion of the New York City ‘Subway’ is elevated above street level. On June 25, 2015, my dad, Jack May, Walter Zullig and I took a whirlwind tour of New York City rail transit, during which I made dozens of photos from myriad locations.

Broadway Junction on June 25, 2015. Exposed with a Fujifilm X-T1.
Broadway Junction on June 25, 2015. Exposed with a Fujifilm X-T1.

New York City’s rail transit, including the subway, is undoubtedly one of the most visually complex transportation systems in North America, and presents endless possibilities for photography.

I’ll plan a series of posts featuring photos from this trip over the coming weeks.

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Brooklyn, New York—TRACKING THE LIGHT DAILY POST

November 1998.

It was a dull autumn day. My father and I were in New York City to visit a friend. We spent the afternoon wandering around on the subway system.

An L train Brooklyn, New York, November 1998. Exposed with a Nikon F3T with 24mm lens. (The route is L, not to be confused with the colloquial 'El' or Chicago's 'L', just for clarification).
An L train Brooklyn, New York, November 1998. Exposed with a Nikon F3T with 24mm lens. (The route is L, not to be confused with the colloquial ‘El’ or Chicago’s ‘L’, just for clarification).

I made this photo at East New York Junction where the Canarsie Line crosses the Broadway Line.

The sky was dark and swollen and the street lights were just coming on. To make the most of the lighting, I exposed this photo on black & white film with my Nikon F3T with an AI 24mm Nikkor lens.

I’ve always felt there was an apocalyptic aesthetic to this image.

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