ITS ALIVE! Lumix LX-7 wakes from the Dead!

I’d reported that my Lumix LX7 coiled up (failed) during the Railway Preservation Society of Ireland’s fall tour earlier this month.

Excessive dampness contributed to the camera’s lifeless qualities.

For several days it was unresponsive.

On the advice of Eric Rosenthal, I placed the camera in a Ziplock back filled with rice and left it there for more than 72 hours. Then I gave it another couple of days.

Finally, with a freshly charged battery I turned it on. The lens hesitated, attempted to extend from the camera body, and then retracted, leading to an error message in the display.

I repeated this action, but on the second attempted, grabbed the front element of the lens and coaxed to the normal extended position. In so doing I freed it from some grit that had been impeding its progress.

I then turned the camera on-off several times to ensure that it was working.

Since that time it seems to have been performing as expected.

My zombie Lumix can’t be trusted though. Once a camera demonstrates failure, I never assume that it will perform flawlessly. So, I’ll still be seeking the LX7s inevitable replacement.

Below are some of the photos from the Zombie Lumix.

Up Irish Rail Mark4 set from Cork arriving at Dublin Heuston Station. Lumix LX7 photo.
Parkgate Street in Dublin at sunset.
Busy day at Heuston Station in Dublin.

Tracking the Light Posts Every Day!

2 thoughts on “ITS ALIVE! Lumix LX-7 wakes from the Dead!”

  1. I feel validated to see that a ‘real’ railfan photographer actually uses a pocketable point-n-shoot camera. Will be watching closely to see the LX-7’s replacement. There are some exciting, serious point-n-shoots out there now, arguably more capable than the DSLRs of the aughts or even early teens.

  2. Halleluiah!

    I had a camera fail from the cold in the Andes, but sadly it never recovered.

    I’m told that keeping your camera in contact with your body is a good idea in chilly conditions, something more readily achievable by the female photographer.

    Michael Walsh

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