Traveling on Trenitalia from Fiumicino Airport

Rail-connected airports have become common on the European continent.

The ability to walk directly from your terminal to a waiting train that takes you directly to your destination is a very civilized way to travel.

Trenitalia’s first class Leonardo Express rests to the left of our double-deck local train (R22112) at Fiumicino Airport.
On board the double-deck I photographed this display screen.
My view of the lower level of the double-deck train.
A photo of the top deck before the train filled up.
The FS (State Railways) Roma Trastevere Station at the time of our arrival. Handheld photo made with my Lumix LX7 in ‘night mode’. (which assembles a composite image in-camera.)

In recent months I’ve learned the intricacies of navigating Trenitalia’s automated ticket machines.

While these have an English language option, to buy a ticket typically requires more than a dozen steps, including ‘continuing’ through various warnings that advise you about pickpockets, unauthorized persons supplying information, and reminders to validate your tickets (you’ve been warned!).

So last week (September 2017) when Honer Travers and I arrived at Rome’s Fiumicino Airport, we were well armed with the knowledge to obtain the correct tickets. We rapidly paged through the automated machine and without difficulties had tickets in hand in just minutes.

We boarded our double-deck local train and were on our way to Roma Travestere.

Buying local transit tickets the next morning wasn’t as painless, as the automated machines we found did not seem to work as intended.

Photos exposed using my Lumix LX7.

Tracking the Light Posts Daily!

One thought on “Traveling on Trenitalia from Fiumicino Airport”

  1. Well done with the machines! I had problems with the French machines in Nice – trying to learn the machine when every second one is out of service and there are lengthy queues for those that are functioning is not recommended. I came back when the station was quiet and managed to figure out how to buy a local regional day ticket, which proved to be in a rather remote sub-menu. I then also learned the hard way about validating tickets in Italy!

Comments are closed.