On the Roll to Derry on NI Railways.

It had been a long time since I’d last traveled NIR’s Belfast to Derry railway line (in the original version of this post, I’d described this as the ‘Derry Road’ but several readers wrote into correct me, as the phrase ‘Derry Road’ refers to the long abandoned GNR route to Derry and not the present NIR line), and while I’ve been over the whole line between Derry and Belfast in stages, I’d never before actually traveled all the way from Belfast to Derry.

So, two weeks ago, Honer Travers and I organized a day out to Derry. We began our rail journey at Lisburn and traveled to Belfast Great Victoria Street where we changed trains.

After a wander in Derry, we returned by rail the way we had come.

I made these photos using my Lumix LX7.

Interior view of a 4000-series CAF train.
Holding the Lumix above my head I made this interior view.
Interior view of a 4000-series CAF train.
Rolling toward Derry, Northern Ireland.
Interior view of a 4000-series CAF train. Although only moderately busy when we departed Belfast, by the time the train arrived at Derry it was packed.
Outside NI Railways’ Derry station.
An NI-Railways train rolls along the Foyle on its return trip to Belfast. In the distance is Derry’s Peace Bridge.
View of the line along the Foyle looking toward Derry’s station from the Peace Bridge. Would this be a better photo with a train?
A panoramic composite photo exposed with my Lumix LX7 from the platform at Derry.

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2 comments on “On the Roll to Derry on NI Railways.

  1. John O'Connor on said:

    Hmm I thought the Derry Road was the former GNRI line from Portadown.

    Super photos though. Think line was closed in last few days because of flooding.

  2. Kieran Comerford on said:

    Hi Brian,
    Nice pictures of the trip to Derry, one that I have yet to make. My impression is the the phrase “Derry Road” referred to the late lamented line to Derry from Portadown through Omagh which was prematurely closed. I note the “Derry Londonderry” that they have to use in the destination, a continuing farce!
    Regards,
    Kieran Comerford