Norfolk Southern at Mexico, Pennsylvania.

No, we are not ‘south of the border.’

This is a location along Norfolk Southern’s old Pennsylvania Railroad Middle Division west of Harrisburg between Thompsontown and Mifflin.

A couple of weeks ago, Pat Yough and I were re-exploring this busy route and these images were among my views from that effort.

Here are three photos from a sequence that I made of Norfolk Southern symbol freight 21A as it approached the grade crossing at Mexico.

Image 1: Norfolk Southern 21A roars west at Mexico, Pennsylvania. Exposed using a FujiFilm X-T1 with 90mm f2.0 telephoto lens.
Image 2: A slightly closer view of Norfolk Southern 21A  at Mexico, Pennsylvania. Exposed using a FujiFilm X-T1 with 90mm f2.0 telephoto lens.
Image 3: Closest of three views of Norfolk Southern 21A  at Mexico, Pennsylvania. Exposed using a FujiFilm X-T1 with 90mm f2.0 telephoto lens.

Which of these do you like best?

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5 thoughts on “Norfolk Southern at Mexico, Pennsylvania.”

  1. All are nice shots but I like the 1st or top photo.
    It’s summertime in PA and the humidity is likely high so one could expect to have hazy conditions.
    The colors on the top photo are vivid and there is less haze visible to the viewer. The background (color) is so clear the viewer can actually see what could be the heat from the exhaust because of the contrast.
    I wonder what filter (if any) or digital tweaking could be used in a similar situation by mere mortals? Possible some sort of Poloriod filter if you take photos of any kind in these conditions?

    1. A UV filter can be use to reduce the effects of aerial haze (which causes a bluish cast and can reduce definition in the distance). I don’t use UV filters because too often I find they result in ghosting of the headlights and ditch lights, which I find more objectionable than blue haze. Other changes could be made to a RAW file in Post Processing, include adjustments to the color temperature ‘warm’ the scene and compensate for the excessive blue light. Post processing sharpening is another option, although I usually avoid it.

      Brian

  2. I like the first one best, for the colors in the containers consist. I really like it.

    I do like the sense of power in the second one, the way the locomotive is leaning into the curve.

    The third one I find weaker because you don’t see enough of the train.

  3. The one in the middle seems to be the most balanced, you have just the right combination of the sense of distance and the natural environs (The mountains), the load carried (the container cars) and the loco itself.

    Were you looking to achieve the Golden Mean?

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