CSX on the Hudson at Mine Dock Park—November 18, 2016.

The sun was just rising over Bear Mountain, when I arrived at Mine Dock Park located on the west shore of the Hudson near Fort Montgomery, New York.

I set up on CSX’s River Line, historically New York Central’s ‘West Shore’ route. At first the signals were all red. Then after a bit the northward signal cleared to ‘medium approach.’

I concluded that a northward train would be taking the siding, thus in all likelihood it would be making a meet with a southward train. I secured an elevated view from the rock cutting north of the public crossing.

About 45 minutes elapsed and then a northward train took the siding as signaled. Six minutes later, this southward CSX autorack freight came gliding down river. I exposed a series of digital images with my Lumix LX7. The sun was perfect and the late autumn foliage on the trees made an already picturesque scene even better.

A southward CSX auto rack train hugs the Hudson at Mine Dock Park. Lumix LX7 photo.
A southward CSX auto rack train hugs the Hudson at Mine Dock Park. Lumix LX7 photo.
The train was moving relatively slowly, which allowed me to zoom out (to a wider focal length) as it approached. Which of the two views do you prefer? A southward CSX auto rack train hugs the Hudson at Mine Dock Park. Lumix LX7 photo.
The train was moving relatively slowly, which allowed me to zoom out (to a wider focal length) as it approached. Which of the two views do you prefer?  Lumix LX7 photo.

Nothing tricky or complicated here; it was just a matter of being in the right place for the action and paying attention to the signals.

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8 thoughts on “CSX on the Hudson at Mine Dock Park—November 18, 2016.”

  1. I, too, prefer the top image.

    Separately, speaking as a Needham guy (yes, there are lots of us) to a Monson guy, I wonder if you might comment on fall foliage photography. Although this late fall shot is not full of the proverbial “blazing” fall foliage, it seems to me that fall foliage rarely (if ever) shows up in photos with the same impact it has on the naked eye. Perhaps you know.

    PS – I tip my cap to any kid who can ride a bike from Needham to Framingham… not a short jaunt by any measure.

    1. The explanation regarding fall foliage is not a simple one. The human and eye and brain process images in completely different ways than still camera does with photographs. The brain makes a composite image, and perhaps more relevant to the color of trees, also sees colors differently. Red, the color of blood, tends to jump out at us because of evolutionary conditioning. This is part of the reason the trees may seem brighter in person than in photos. There are textbooks on this subject. Brian Solomon

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