Tracking the Light on Tracking the Light.

Just a word or few on this blog:

For more than three years I’ve made an effort to post something new, each and every day.

If you are not already subscribed, have you considered subscribing? There is no cost: the primary advantage to a subscription is that an automatic notice is sent out with each and every post. This is more reliable than feeds via Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, and even my own Email notices.

I prepare posts in advance and put them in a queue on Word Press. I’ll assign to each posting a date and a time when it is supposed to appear on the web.

Sometimes owing to a technical fault, posts may miss its scheduled posting time. When that happens, I have to manipulate the system and post manually. (Post is both a noun a verb).

I like to keep the site timely, but it’s not intended as an up to the minute news source.

Although I often write daily, I tend plan post schedules so that photos  appear several days after I make them. This is by intent.

That said, sometimes when I find something of immediate interest (such as Monday’s IWT Liner), I’ll make an effort to get the subject out there quickly for public consumption. (Thus Tracking the Light’s ‘Extra Posts’).

In other situations, I’ll capture something unique (or at least very unusual) but opt to hold that back for future presentation.

For every photo I’ve displayed on Tracking the Light, I have dozens more waiting for their day in the sun (metaphorically). The very best have yet to be seen!

For the next few days I’ll be traveling and may not have regular access to the internet. As a result, Tracking the Light will be coasting ‘autopilot.’

This means, I’ve placed a large batch of posts in the queue so that you should see something every day while I’m on the road.

If for some reason, a post misses its posting time, I may not be in a position to fix it right away.

Fear not, new material is being exposed! On digital, and with film.

Stay tuned!

An Amtrak Empire Service train led by a dual-mode GE Genesis diesel makes for a modern silhouette along the Hudson at Castleton, New York in 2004. Exposed on Fujichrome using a Contax G2 rangefinder with 28mm Zeiss Biogon.
An Amtrak Empire Service train led by a dual-mode GE Genesis diesel makes for a modern silhouette along the Hudson at Castleton, New York in 2004. Exposed on Fujichrome using a Contax G2 rangefinder with 28mm Zeiss Biogon.