Steam, Sun, Mist and Film: RPSI 461 at Bray Head, Part 2.

Exposed on Fuji Provia 100F using a Canon EOS-3 with 40mm pancake lens. Exposure calculated with the aid of a hand held Minolta Mark IV light meter. And yes, I hiked all the way around the head with all that equipment including my digital cameras.
Exposed on Fuji Provia 100F using a Canon EOS-3 with 40mm pancake lens. Exposure calculated with the aid of a hand held Minolta Mark IV light meter. And yes, I hiked all the way around the head with all that equipment including my digital cameras.

Why film? A few weeks back, I posted some views I exposed digitally of locomotive 461 emerging from the sea mist at Bray Head. See: Steam, Diesel and Electric at Bray Head on Easter Monday.
This was Railway Preservation Society of Ireland’s annual Dublin-Wicklow Easter Eggspress, which ran on Easter Monday, April 6, 2015.

I wrote in my earlier posting:

    Despite clear skies and warm spring weather, wafting sea fog made for challenging photographic conditions.

     Shortly before locomotive 461 emerged from the tunnels near Brandy Hole, a cloud of fog rose to add a bit of atmosphere.

      The mix of stunning scenery, wafting fog and bright sun made for a spectacular backdrop for the annual special.

While I made a sequence of digital photos with my Fujifilm X-T1. I was also poised with my Canon EOS 3 with 40mm pancake lens loaded with Provia 100F (color slide film). I reserved film for the most dramatic angles. Last week the slides were returned from the processing lab (Dwayne’s Photo in Parsons, Kansas see: www.dwaynesphoto.com/) and I’ve scanned the slides for presentation here.

As the photographer, I feel that these images are the best of my morning’s efforts.

Some people may ask, ‘If you have a digital camera, why do you still use film?’, others may inquire, ‘If you have a perfectly good film camera, why did buy an expensive new digital camera?’

Each mode of making photos has its strengths and weaknesses. I routinely exposed photos both using film cameras and digitally.

When I get a really nice scene on a bright sunny day, I often put it on film (and I may exposed a digital image as well). In that way I get the best of both worlds. I can’t think of a good reason why film and digital photograph should be mutually exclusive, especially since they complement each other nicely.

My color slides from April 6, 2015 are now also digital images, thanks to my Epson V600. If we have a slide show, I’ll project the slides the old fashioned way.

RPSI_461_Bray_Head_6April2015_©BrianSolomon_268120

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