Dublin Panorama and the World’s Longest Tram

Among the features of the Fuji X-T1 is a setting to make broad panoramic images. This is done by sweeping the camera across a scene as it exposes a burst of images in rapid succession. The camera’s internal software then assembles the images as a horizontal image.

Dusk at Sean Heuston Bridge looking toward Heuston Station. I've made a broad sweep using the panorama feature. This sews together a bunch of images exposed in rapid order.
Dusk at Sean Heuston Bridge looking toward Heuston Station. I’ve made a broad sweep using the panorama feature. This sews together a bunch of images exposed in rapid order.

Using this feature as intended will produce a convincing panoramic photograph. However if subjects move they may appear more than once or become altered beyond recognition.

I experimented by panning a LUAS tram in panoramic mode. The result looks like the world’s longest tram.

I set the panoramic mode as I panned a LUAS tram arriving at Heuston Station. The effect was this image that appears to be 'the world's longest tram.'
I set the panoramic mode as I panned a LUAS tram arriving at Heuston Station. The effect was this image that appears to be ‘the world’s longest tram.’

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