Breakneck Ridge Revisited.

In the 1940s, New York Central photographer Ed Nowak often posed trains near Breakneck Ridge (north of Cold Spring, New York. In the 1960s, my dad made photographs of lightning stripe E-units here.  I first visited with my dad and brother in the early 1980s. Back in 1989, I used USGS topographical maps to suss angles from the ridge.

On January 20, 2015, I parked near the north portal of the famous tunnels and followed the designated trail up the side of the ridge. It had been a fair few years since I was here last.

The clouds began to part in the west and for about 45 minutes there was low filtered sun on the rail. I exposed a few color slides and digital images of passing Metro-North and Amtrak trains.

A Metro-North northward train approaches the tunnels at Breakneck Ridge. Canon EOS with 40mm pancake lens.
A Metro-North northward train approaches the tunnels at Breakneck Ridge. Canon EOS with 40mm pancake lens.
Amtrak northward Empire Corridor train seen from Breakneck Ridge.
Amtrak northward Empire Corridor train seen from Breakneck Ridge.
One of the Hudson's most iconic landmarks; Bannerman Castle—as viewed from Breakneck Ridge. The trees are taller than I remember.
One of the Hudson’s most iconic landmarks; Bannerman Castle—as viewed from Breakneck Ridge. The trees are taller than I remember.

I kept thinking about all the Hudsons, Niagaras, and Mohawks, the General Motors E unit and Alco PA diesels, and even the classic former New Haven FL9s that passed this famous location in former times.

In an era when so many places have changed beyond recognition, it’s nice to be able to visit a spot that looks more or less the way I expect. Even if the locomotives have changed, and the operators are different; the scenery remains some of the finest in the East, and the line is still busy!

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