Former PRR Four Track Line at Work.

It helps to be at the right place at the right time. Even on the busy Philadelphia-Washington D.C. Northeast Corridor there can be long gaps between trains..

After 20 minutes or half and hour between trains, you might wonder why the line even has four tracks!

And then ever thing seems converge upon you at once.

Pat Yough and I were at Crum Lynne, Pennsylvania on the evening of January 11, 2015. We didn’t spend much time trackside before we had two running meets a few minutes apart.

SEPTA Silverliner Vs pass near Crum Lynne, Pennsylvania. The train on the left is approaching its station stop, while the train on right accelerates toward 30th Street Philadelphia. Canon EOS 7D with 200mm lens. ISO 400.
SEPTA Silverliner Vs pass near Crum Lynne, Pennsylvania. The train on the left is approaching its station stop, while the train on right accelerates toward 30th Street Philadelphia. Canon EOS 7D with 200mm lens. ISO 400.
The same two trains a few moments later. Canon EOS 7D with 200mm lens. ISO 400.
The same two trains a few moments later. Canon EOS 7D with 200mm lens. ISO 400.
Just three minutes after the rolling meet between SEPTA trains on the outside tracks, we witnessed this high-speed meet between Amtrak trains on the inside tracks. Canon EOS 7D with 200mm lens. ISO 400.
Just three minutes after the rolling meet between SEPTA trains on the outside tracks, we witnessed this high-speed meet between Amtrak trains on the inside tracks. Canon EOS 7D with 200mm lens. ISO 400.

Was this synchronicity? Or just luck? I don’t know. In the case of the two Amtrak trains both were running a few minutes late, so that was luck. It would have been cool to see all four pass at the same time, but unless we were phenomenally lucky, it is doubtful that such an event would have produced good photos.

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One thought on “Former PRR Four Track Line at Work.”

  1. The four-track pictures are really nostalgic for me. The first rail-fanning I can remember as a really little kid was standing on the NYC platform at Woodlawn on the Harlem Division. We moved away from there when I was six, so I really was a little kid. That was like standing in the middle of someone’s 1:1 train layout. The idea that a railroad would be one track, with no train for hours on end came later, and as a real let-down.

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