York Train Shed—Tracking the Light Daily Post

4 July, 1999.

A funny way to spend American Independence Day: I was on my way from London to Scotland, and I stopped over at York to intercept Britain’s most famous steam locomotive, engine 4472, better known as Flying Scotsman.

This was my first visit to York, and I was fascinated by the Victorian train shed. Using my Nikon N90S, I exposed a variety of images on Fujichrome.

 The unusual curved York train shed was built between 1871 and 1877. A Virgin Cross Country HST pauses at York on 4 July 1999. This was led by one of the less-common varieties of the Class 43 power units that featured buffers. Exposed on Fujichrome Sensia using a Nikon N90S with 24mm lens.

The unusual curved York train shed was built between 1871 and 1877. A Virgin Cross Country HST pauses at York on 4 July 1999. This was led by one of the less-common varieties of the Class 43 power units that featured buffers. Exposed on Fujichrome Sensia using a Nikon N90S with 24mm lens.
Looking like the ribs of some ancient beast, I made this study of the cast iron members of York’s Victorian train shed. Fujichrome Sensia using a Nikon N90S with 80-200mm zoom lens.
Looking like the ribs of some ancient beast, I made this study of the cast iron members of York’s Victorian train shed. Fujichrome Sensia using a Nikon N90S with 80-200mm zoom lens.

Five months later, I returned with my Rolleiflex to document the shed on medium format film. Both those photos and the images of Flying Scotsman may be the topics of future posts.

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