Philadelphia 30th Street Station

DAILY POST: Vestiges of the Pennsylvania Railroad

46 Years Later, Hints Remain of the Old Order.

 Philadelphia was the Pennsylvania Railroad’s headquarters city. Despite multitudes of change in the industry since PRR merged with New York Central in 1968, there’s still plenty of  Pennsy cues around Philly.

For me this is like finding hints of a long lost empire.

Philadelphia
Pennsylvania Railroad’s Suburban Station. Lumix LX3.
Interior of 30th Street Station. The commemorative statue depicts an angel carrying a soldier skyward which symbolizes PRR’s employees who perished in action during World War II.
Interior of 30th Street Station. The commemorative statue depicts an angel carrying a soldier skyward which symbolizes PRR’s employees who perished in action during World War II.

 

The keystone was PRR's symbol. If one searches around Philadelphia's 30th Street, there are still plenty of PRR keystones to be found. Lumix LX3 photo.
The keystone was PRR’s symbol. If one searches around Philadelphia’s 30th Street, there are still plenty of PRR keystones to be found. Lumix LX3 photo.
Old PRR station at Clifton-Aldan, Pennsylvania. Lumix LX3 photo.
Old PRR station at Clifton-Aldan, Pennsylvania. Lumix LX3 photo.
Railroad signal.
A PRR-style position light signal at Overbrook, displays an ‘Approach-Medium’ aspect. Canon EOS 7D photo.
Overbrook Station on the Main Line, as seen on the evening of January 18, 2014.
Overbrook Station on the Main Line, as seen on the evening of January 18, 2014.

 [click here for views of the January 20th 2014 Schuylkill River derailment]

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See:  Exploring SEPTA

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2 thoughts on “DAILY POST: Vestiges of the Pennsylvania Railroad”

  1. I’m hoping a book of Philadelphia-area photos is in the works. Outstanding Philly photos in yesterday and today’s posts. I lived in Wynnewood for nine years… Your comment about the visibility of SEPTA is spot-on. The old-fashioned infrastructure (street car lines, surface lines through suburbs, multiple big downtown hub stations) means there are trains to see everywhere you look.

    1. As of this minute, I don’t have a specific Philadelphia-area book in the works, although between myself, my brother and my father, we could quite easily illustrate one. I did author a book with Voyegeur Press titled Railroads of Pennsylvania which had many Philadelphia/Eastern PA photos in it. That came out about 2008.
      Cheers,
      Brian S

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