DAILY POST: How Do I Find Trains?

A Beginner’s Course in Paying Attention.

I’m often asked, “How do I find trains to photograph?”

CSX's former Boston & Albany mainline at West Warren on Sunday October 20, 2013. Canon EOS 7D photo.
CSX’s former Boston & Albany mainline at West Warren on Sunday October 20, 2013. Canon EOS 7D photo.

The short (and not especially enlightening answer) is that I pay close attention to the railway. (Whichever railway I’m photographing). Here are some basic tips:

1) Always pay attention.

2) Carefully study the details of the operation you wish to photograph: Learn when crews are called, how far they normally work, and what is expected of them en route. How long does it take to make a brake test? How long to make a station stop? How long to make a set-out or pick-up? Where are passing sidings and what are the distances between them. Learn about train weights, locomotive performance, and rates of acceleration and braking. Learn grade profiles and how these can affect train speeds. Find out about slow orders (both temporary and those in the timetable). Keep in mind, a scanner can only help you when you understand the information it provides.

3) Use these details to find out how they may affect when trains run.

4) Learn to distinguish good information from poor information.

5) Never assume anything without good solid information.

6) Don’t assume that everyday is the same (but always learn from the passage of trains, make careful notes as to the times trains pass and how long it takes for them to get between stations, and why.).

7) When interpreting schedules, find out how a specific schedule is to be used by the railway in question.

8) Know what questions to ask, and find the right people to ask.

9) Don’t assume that because someone works for a railroad that they are up to date on operations. Railroaders are like photographers, if three of them answer a question, you’ll get four answers.

10) Don’t expect railroaders to: ‘tell you when the train is coming.’ (see number 9).

11) Remember: on a railway plans will change, trains may be delayed, and no day is ever exactly the same (except in Switzerland).

12) Never assume there isn’t a train coming; you’ll be surprised.

13) When a train passes take the time to learn about it. Was it a regularly scheduled move? Was it an unscheduled extra? Was it running to schedule or was it hours late? Is it scheduled to run daily, three times a week or once a year? IF it runs daily, is it scheduled for the same time every day? If it doesn’t run at the same time, find out why.

14) When nearby a railway always use your ears. LISTEN! One of the best tip-offs that a train is approaching are the sounds it makes. Listen for whistles, engines working upgrade, as well as the sounds of braking, and cars clattering. Listen for switch points being moved or other tips that something may be about to happen.

15) Learn a railroad’s signaling and how its signals are expected to normally work. No two signaling systems are exactly the same. Learn when ‘red’ means a train is coming and ‘green’ means one is not (and vice versa!) Also, when ‘yellow’ means you just missed the train you were hoping to see.

16) Remember, a train is coming (but so is Christmas).

17) Put all of the pieces to puzzle into play.

18) Be patient.

19) Be persistent.

20) Take notes.

21) Accept that everyday is a learning experience.

CSX eastward intermodal freight (probably Q012) passes West Warren, Massachusetts on Sunday morning October 20, 2013. Canon EOS 7D with 40mm Pancake lens. A scanner, detailed knowledge of CSX operations, and patience all helped in executing this image.
CSX eastward intermodal freight (probably Q012) passes West Warren, Massachusetts on Sunday morning October 20, 2013. Canon EOS 7D with 40mm Pancake lens. A scanner, detailed knowledge of CSX operations, and patience all helped in executing this image.

More on finding Passenger and Freight trains in future posts.

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