Central Vermont Railway, Three Rivers, Massachusetts May 1984

My Rare Photo of a CV Switcher. 

 

Central Vermont 1510
Central Vermont SW1200 1510 works the Tampax Factory spur at Bridge Street in Three Rivers, Massachusetts back in May 1984. Exposed on Ektachrome 200 with a Leica 3A and 50mm Summitar lens. Scan modified in post processing to improve contrast and exposure and minimize dust spots.

The other day, I was showing Tim Doherty some photo locations around Three Rivers, Massachusetts. I described to him how the railroad once had a spur into the old Tampax factory.

The spur (siding) had a switch off the mainline near the station (demolished many years ago), then crossed Main Street and made  a sharp curve behind the liquor store before crossing Bridge Street. There’s still vestiges of this track today.

Back in 1984, Dan Howard was visiting from Needham and he and I drove around the Palmer area making railway photos (as you do). The prize of the day, was this photo of CV’s SW1200 1510 working the Tampax factory spur on the Bridge Street Crossing.

It is one of the few photos I have of a CV switcher working in the Palmer area, and one of the few times I caught a rail movement on the Tampax spur. (Might creative minds develop some accompanying humor  ??)

This photo was exposed on Kodak Ektachrome 200 slide film with my Leica 3A using my 50mm Summitar lens. It was a sultry dull day, and not the best for photography. While this is not a world class image, it captures a scene never to be repeated.

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6 thoughts on “Central Vermont Railway, Three Rivers, Massachusetts May 1984”

  1. I just love obscure ”out of the way” sidings Brian, not many in Ireland, but a few, even the surounding road vehicles are interesting, off topic, do you regret going digital late, I might have bigger regrets, but the ”twin strategy” of ”playing around” Im trying at the moment, is kind of fun in an Irish heat wave.

    1. I don’t regret having many of my best photos on film. My belief is that film is more likely to survive the years because of its greater stability than all known digital storage and by virtue of its tangible qualities (you can see the pictures by looking at them). Plus film can be scanned.
      However, I regret not getting a good digital camera sooner. I could have saved a fortune in processing. I still expose some film, and routinely carry a film camera on big trips, but I shoot far less film now than I did five years ago. Digital is also easier in regards to the internet and etc. I worry that I’ll spend years scanning all my older photos!

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